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Oxymoronica : Paradoxical Wit and Wisdom from History's Greatest Wordsmiths
by Mardy Grothe

Overview -

ox-y-mor-on-i-ca (OK-se-mor-ON-uh-ca) noun, plural: Any variety of tantalizing, self-contradictory statements or observations that on the surface appear false or illogical, but at a deeper level are true, often profoundly true. See also oxymoron, paradox.examples: "Melancholy is the pleasure of being sad."Victor Hugo"To lead the people, walk behind them." Lao-tzu"You'd be surprised how much it coststo look this cheap."Dolly Parton

You won't find the word "oxymoronica" in any dictionary (at least not yet) because Dr.  Read more...


 
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    Oxymoronica (Paperback)
    Published: 2015-06-01
    Publisher: Harper Paperbacks
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More About Oxymoronica by Mardy Grothe
 
 
 
Overview

ox-y-mor-on-i-ca (OK-se-mor-ON-uh-ca) noun, plural: Any variety of tantalizing, self-contradictory statements or observations that on the surface appear false or illogical, but at a deeper level are true, often profoundly true. See also oxymoron, paradox.examples: "Melancholy is the pleasure of being sad."Victor Hugo"To lead the people, walk behind them." Lao-tzu"You'd be surprised how much it coststo look this cheap."Dolly Parton

You won't find the word "oxymoronica" in any dictionary (at least not yet) because Dr. Mardy Grothe introduces it to readers in this delightful collection of 1,400 of the most provocative quotations of all time. From ancient thinkers like Confucius, Aristotle, and Saint Augustine to great writers like Shakespeare, Oscar Wilde, and G. B. Shaw to modern social observers like Woody Allen and Lily Tomlin, Oxymoronica celebrates the power and beauty of paradoxical thinking. All areas of human activity are explored, including love, sex and romance, politics, the arts, the literary life, and, of course, marriage and family life. The wise and witty observations in this book are as highly entertaining as they are intellectually nourishing and are sure to grab the attention of language lovers everywhere.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780060536992
  • ISBN-10: 0060536993
  • Publisher: HarperResource
  • Publish Date: March 2004
  • Page Count: 246


Related Categories

Books > Reference > Quotations
Books > Language Arts & Disciplines > General

 
BookPage Reviews

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Oxymoronica is an addictive little book of paradoxical sayings presented by a lover of the English language who has amassed thousands of them. Dr. Mardy Grothe coined the term "oxymoronica" to suggest not just a contradiction of terms, but a contradiction of ideas.

"You'd be surprised how much it costs to look this cheap." Beneath this sweet self-deprecation of Dolly Parton lies a pointed observation about popular images. From a different corner of musical culture comes this remark on Mozart's sonatas: "they are too easy for children, and too difficult for adults."

The author ranges across every conceivable region of human affairs, for willful self-contradiction abounds in them all. There's even a final chapter of "inadvertent" paradoxes, where President Bush plays a central role: "People say I'm indecisive, but I don't know about that."

Many of the sayings take some time to sort out, like any good puzzle. "I find nothing more depressing than optimism." "To oppose something is to maintain it." Then there are the ones that had better not be true, however witty they may be: "I never read a book before reviewing it; it prejudices one so."

 
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