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How to Paint a Dead Man
by Sarah Hall


Overview - From Sarah Hall, the acclaimed, award-winning author of Daughters of the North and The Electric Michelangelo comes the Harper Perennial paperback original novel How to Paint a Dead Man, a daringly imaginative tale in which multiple lives are woven together through the prism of a still life painting.  Read more...

 
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More About How to Paint a Dead Man by Sarah Hall
 
 
 
Overview
From Sarah Hall, the acclaimed, award-winning author of Daughters of the North and The Electric Michelangelo comes the Harper Perennial paperback original novel How to Paint a Dead Man, a daringly imaginative tale in which multiple lives are woven together through the prism of a still life painting. Moving from Italy to England, spanning nearly half a century, and bringing together the lives of four disparate characters, How to Paint a Dead Man is Hall's fierce and brilliant study of art and its place in our lives.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780061430459
  • ISBN-10: 0061430455
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial
  • Publish Date: September 2009
  • Page Count: 289
  • Dimensions: 8 x 5.28 x 0.76 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.52 pounds

Series: P.S.

Related Categories

Books > Fiction > General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 40.
  • Review Date: 2009-07-27
  • Reviewer: Staff

Stunning visual descriptions link the stories of four artists in crisis in Hall's fourth novel (after Daughters of the North), but marginal, cross-generational relationships are what ground the book. Giorgio is a well-known painter and hermit in Italy in the 1960s, the near-blind Annette his favorite primary school student. Peter is a 50-something landscape artist in England, and Peter's daughter, Susan, a talented photographer and curator. Giorgio has cancer and for his final days tackles one last painting of his constant subject, colored bottles. Soon after his death, Annette tends his grave, innocent and fearful and now completely blind, fearing imaginary things like the Bestia—a demon that is depicted in her church. Thirty years later, Peter, who corresponded with Giorgio, is pinned under a boulder near his cottage, and contemplates the haunting relationship he had with his ex-wife, while in present-day London, Susan searches for feeling (through sex) after the sudden loss of her twin brother. Hall gracefully conveys a sense of the eternal through these imaginative, disconnected creatures who share the same unrelentingly contemplative disposition. (Sept.)

 
BookPage Reviews

Daring fourth novel from an English literary star

Some authors write the same book over and over again. Sarah Hall is not one of those writers. With novels focusing on the Cumbrian countryside (Haweswater), the American adventures of an English tattoo artist (The Electric Michaelangelo) and the dystopian future (Daughters of the North), Hall has proven that there's no topic she'll refuse to tackle.

Her fourth novel, which made the 2009 Man Booker Prize shortlist, is no exception. How to Paint a Dead Man may be Hall's most ambitious work yet. It features four main protagonists, jumps back and forth in time from post-war Italy to modern-day England, and deals with themes of art, loss and death. Hardly a cheery read, yet Hall's tight, stylish prose, marked by inventive turns of phrase, carries the reader through the story even when there's not much story to be had. The strongest thread (to this reader, at least) was the voice of Susan, which opens and closes the book. Her twin brother, Danny, has just died in a biking accident, and she's coping with the loss through an affair with her married coworker. Also compelling is the voice of Susan's father, Peter, a landscape artist who finds himself trapped in the wilderness he loves. His thoughts while waiting for rescue take the reader across America in the tumultuous 1960s art scene and behind the scenes of his passionate first marriage. The two other voices come from another country and an earlier time: An Italian artist with a tragic past whom Peter holds a one-way correspondence with, and Annette, a young girl who lives in the same Tuscan village and has been diagnosed with a degenerative sight disorder.

Though the stories at first seem disconnected, they gradually reveal hidden connections between the, and this unfolding keeps the reader engaged. Each narrator, in his or her own way, contemplates the power of art and the acceptance of mortality. Along with contemporaries like Scarlett Thomas and Lydia Millet, Hall is staking new ground for women in the "novel of ideas" category. Full of haunting images and thought-provoking ideas, How to Paint a Dead Man will linger in the mind.

 
BAM Customer Reviews