Flash Sale
Holy War : How Vasco Da Gama's Epic Voyages Turned the Tide in a Centuries-Old Clash of Civilizations
by Nigel Cliff


Overview - HistorianNigel Cliff delivers a sweeping, radical reinterpretation of Vasco da Gama spioneering voyages, revealing their significance as a decisive turning point inthe struggle between Christianity and Islam a series of events which foreveraltered the relationship between East and West.  Read more...

 
Hardcover
  • $29.99

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock.

FREE Shipping for Club Members
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 19 copies from $2.99
 
Download

This item is available only to U.S. billing addresses.
 
 
 
 

More About Holy War by Nigel Cliff
 
 
 
Overview
HistorianNigel Cliff delivers a sweeping, radical reinterpretation of Vasco da Gama spioneering voyages, revealing their significance as a decisive turning point inthe struggle between Christianity and Islam a series of events which foreveraltered the relationship between East and West. Perfect for readers of Endurance Shackleton s Incredible Voyage, Galileo sDaughter, and Atlantic, this first-ever completeaccount of da Gama s voyages includes new information from the recentlydiscovered diaries of his sailors and an extraordinary series of lettersbetween da Gama and the Zamorin, a king of modern-dayKerala, India. Cliff, the author of The Shakespeare Riots, draws uponhis own travels in da Gama s footsteps to add detail, authenticity, and acontemporary perspective to this riveting, one-of-a-kind historical epic."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780061735127
  • ISBN-10: 0061735124
  • Publisher: HarperTorch
  • Publish Date: September 2011
  • Page Count: 547


Related Categories

Books > History > Expeditions & Discoveries
Books > History > Europe - Spain & Portugal
Books > History > Asia - India & South Asia

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-06-27
  • Reviewer: Staff

In this fresh take on the history of the age of discovery, British historian Cliff (The Shakespeare Riots) not only recovers the story of Vasco da Gama's voyages (long overshadowed by Columbus's) for our times. He also uncovers da Gama's complex motives. In 1498, his fleet he set sail ; from Lisbon to open a sea route from Europe to Asia and "unlock the age-old secrets of the spice trade," but also to reconquer Jerusalem from the Muslims and bring the Second Coming. After almost a year on the seas, tossed about by heavy storms and ravaged by disease and lack of food and water, the fleet found its way to India, which da Gama helped to conquer for Portugal. Yet, as Cliff points out, da Gama's men had arrived in India not just to acquire wealth; they were the new crusaders. They began as soon as they landed to push out the Muslim merchants and establish Christianity as the dominant religion. Da Gama's voyages, says Cliff, were the dividing line between the eras of Muslim ascendancy—the Middle Ages—and of Christian ascendancy—the modern age. Though occasionally digressive, Cliff's historical sketch opens new vistas on much-explored territory. 8 pages of color illus.; printed endpaper map. (Sept.)

 
BookPage Reviews

An explorer’s lasting legacy

Christopher Columbus and Vasco da Gama had the same goal: a sea route to “the Indies.” Despite our October holiday, it’s abundantly clear who succeeded. The Portuguese da Gama decisively won the contest by rounding Africa’s Cape of Good Hope and finding his way to the wealthy spice port of Calicut in India in 1498. Columbus’ voyages had the greater long-term impact by opening the Americas to European colonization. But historian Nigel Cliff argues in his sweeping Holy War that da Gama’s deeds had a huge influence on the economic and cultural competition between East and West that continues today.

Da Gama’s sea journeys provide the framework for Cliff’s epic, but he is only a symbol of the larger Portuguese imperial effort in the 15th and 16th centuries. Portugal’s royal house had two interwoven objectives: the worldwide spread of Christianity and the acquisition of wealth. Spurred on by their mistaken belief in a nonexistent Eastern Christian king called “Prester John,” they set out to break the Muslim Arab monopoly on the spice trade from India to Europe. Da Gama was the perfect spearhead.

Da Gama’s encounters with Africa and India make a compelling adventure tale, told by Cliff with the right mix of sweep and detail. Cliff portrays da Gama as tough, smart, ruthless and consumed with the hatred of Islam typical of his Iberian crusader background. He was a far better leader than Columbus, and although he certainly made mistakes—for example, he was long under the strange misapprehension that the Hindus were Christians—he got results.

Christianity didn’t triumph throughout the globe, but Cliff argues that the maritime empire created by da Gama and his successors through bloodshed and guile did tip the economic balance of power from the Middle East to Europe. That empire was mismanaged and short-lived, but the Dutch and English followed where the Portuguese led. The consequences linger.

 
BAM Customer Reviews