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How to Write a Sentence : And How to Read One
by Stanley Eugene Fish


Overview -

New York Times Bestseller

Both deeper and more democratic than The Elements of Style Adam Haslett, Financial Times

A guided tour through some of the most beautiful, arresting sentences in the English language. Slate

Like a long periodic sentence, this book rumbles along, gathers steam, shifts gears, and packs a wallop.  Read more...


 
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More About How to Write a Sentence by Stanley Eugene Fish
 
 
 
Overview

New York Times Bestseller

Both deeper and more democratic than The Elements of Style Adam Haslett, Financial Times

A guided tour through some of the most beautiful, arresting sentences in the English language. Slate

Like a long periodic sentence, this book rumbles along, gathers steam, shifts gears, and packs a wallop. Roy Blount Jr.

In this entertaining and erudite New York Times bestseller, beloved professor Stanley Fish offers both sentence craft and sentence pleasure. Drawing on a wide range of great writers, from Philip Roth to Antonin Scalia to Jane Austen, How to Write a Sentence is much more than a writing manual it is a spirited love letter to the written word, and a key to understanding how great writing works.

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Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780061840548
  • ISBN-10: 0061840548
  • Publisher: HarperTorch
  • Publish Date: January 2011
  • Page Count: 165


Related Categories

Books > Language Arts & Disciplines > Composition & Creative Writing - General
Books > Language Arts & Disciplines > Rhetoric

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-01-31
  • Reviewer: Staff

A whole book on the lowly sentence? Stanley Fish, America's English Professor, confides that he belongs "to the tribe of sentence watchers," and shares his passion and learning through an array of examples from sentence-making masters, among them Milton, James, Dr. King, Sterne, Swift, Salinger, Elmore Leonard, Conrad, and Gertrude Stein. For Fish, language is logic. He stresses how the sentence, regardless of length—whether declarative or embroidered with qualifiers—is a structure of logical relationships. He discusses the all-important opening sentence and closing sentence, especially as the latter can be isolated from its dramatic context to convey full rhetorical effect. The reader is advised to begin with form; with practice, writers can develop three basics of style (subordinating, additive, satiric) that will allow them to make an emotional impact with their words. In the end, the craft of sentence writing is elevated to the very center of our inner lives. Fish plays the opinion card well, though a piling on of example after example, particularly of long sentences drawn from literature or theology, might leave more experienced sentence-makers to cry, "Enough already!" (Jan. 25)

 
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