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An Autobiography
by Agatha Christie


Overview - Back in print in an all-new edition, is the engaging and illuminating chronicle of the life of the Queen of Mystery. Fans of Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple and readers of John Curran s fascinating biographies Agatha Christie s Secret Notebooks and Murder in the Making will be spellbound by the compelling, authoritative account of one of the world s most influential and fascinating novelists, told in her own words and inimitable style.  Read more...

 
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More About An Autobiography by Agatha Christie
 
 
 
Overview
Back in print in an all-new edition, is the engaging and illuminating chronicle of the life of the Queen of Mystery. Fans of Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple and readers of John Curran s fascinating biographies Agatha Christie s Secret Notebooks and Murder in the Making will be spellbound by the compelling, authoritative account of one of the world s most influential and fascinating novelists, told in her own words and inimitable style. The New York Times Book Review calls Christie s autobiography a joyful adventure, saying, she brings the sense of wonder...to her extraordinary career. "

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780062073594
  • ISBN-10: 0062073591
  • Publisher: HarperCollins
  • Publish Date: November 2011
  • Page Count: 542


Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Literary

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-08-29
  • Reviewer: Staff

Originally published in 1977 and out-of-print, this new edition of Christie’s autobiography includes a CD of the grand dame of mystery authors expounding on her life as a writer—making it especially welcome as a holiday treat for all Christie fans. Although Christie’s tales reportedly still sell in numbers only exceeded by the Bible and Shakespeare, and are almost as timeless, her life (1890–1976) and work go back a long way. If the descriptions of the happy (despite the death of her feckless father), comfortable Victorian-era childhood of a genius of genre strikes as a bit ingenuous, things become more delectable with maturity: the travels, the coming-out parties, the nursing career, first marriage, and first publication (The Mysterious Affair at Styles). Christie’s decision to utter not a word about her celebrated disappearance is as revealing as it is secretive. Her second marriage, to a younger Catholic archeologist, marks the beginning of the “satisfying” years (known to most people as the Great Depression). In all, after a somewhat tiresome first third in muted colors, this memoir fulfills the intention to extend by one year the 120th anniversary celebration of Christie’s birth. 8 pages of color, 16 pages of b&w photos. (Nov. 22)

 
BookPage Reviews

Remembering a life of crime

Reading Agatha Christie’s autobiography is like sitting down to tea with an especially chatty, good-natured auntie; one would never suspect her of slipping arsenic in your drink. The Queen of Crime, it turns out, was also a gifted and engaging memoirist, and readers who missed out on the 1977 publication of An Autobiography will be delighted with its reissue, timed to celebrate the 120th anniversary of Dame Christie’s birth.

As Christie’s grandson Mathew Prichard notes in his foreword, much of this autobiography focuses on her childhood, a happy and imaginative time that laid the groundwork for her future writing career. Young Agatha was a natural storyteller, creating imaginary friends known as The Kittens, and later inventing The School, a series of stories she spun about a group of schoolgirls. Learning about poisons while working in a pharmaceutical dispensary during the First World War gave Christie the idea for a detective story, which eventually became The Mysterious Affair at Styles, her first published book; witnessing the plight of Belgian refugees in England inspired Christie to make her detective Belgian—and thus Hercule Poirot was born. A marriage to handsome airman Archibald Christie was happy for a time, but Archie, it turns out, couldn’t much bear unhappiness. Agatha’s mother’s death in 1926 led to his affair and her infamous disappearance later that year. Christie doesn’t address the disappearance directly here, but says enough about her mental state to support theories that suggest she’d had a nervous breakdown of sorts.

Funny anecdotes about surfing with Archie in Hawaii and Cape Town (who knew Dame Christie could stand-up surf?), a happy second marriage to archaeologist Max Mallowan and periods spent with him on site in Iraq and Turkey are all fascinating. Christie’s enjoyment of the “indulgence” of memoir writing is apparent on every page of this lovely book, giving it a cheerful tone, as if she’s just turned to face you across the tea table to tell you a story. Packaged with a CD of newly discovered recordings of Christie dictating portions of the book, An Autobiography is essential for both mystery and memoir readers alike.

 
BAM Customer Reviews