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A Mercy
by Toni Morrison

Overview - A powerful tragedy distilled into a jewel of a masterpiece by the Nobel Prize-winning author of "Beloved" and, almost like a prelude to that story, set two centuries earlier.
In the 1680s the slave trade was still in its infancy. In the Americas, virulent religious and class divisions, prejudice and oppression were rife, providing the fertile soil in which slavery and race hatred were planted and took root.
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More About A Mercy by Toni Morrison
 
 
 
Overview
A powerful tragedy distilled into a jewel of a masterpiece by the Nobel Prize-winning author of "Beloved" and, almost like a prelude to that story, set two centuries earlier.
In the 1680s the slave trade was still in its infancy. In the Americas, virulent religious and class divisions, prejudice and oppression were rife, providing the fertile soil in which slavery and race hatred were planted and took root.
Jacob is an Anglo-Dutch trader and adventurer, with a small holding in the harsh north. Despite his distaste for dealing in "flesh," he takes a small slave girl in part payment for a bad debt from a plantation owner in Catholic Maryland. This is Florens, "with the hands of a slave and the feet of a Portuguese lady." Florens looks for love, first from Lina, an older servant woman at her new master's house, but later from a handsome blacksmith, an African, never enslaved.
There are other voices: Lina, whose tribe was decimated by smallpox; their mistress, Rebekka, herself a victim of religious intolerance back in England; Sorrow, a strange girl who's spent her early years at sea; and finally the devastating voice of Florens' mother. These are all men and women inventing themselves in the wilderness.
"A Mercy" reveals what lies beneath the surface of slavery. But at its heart it is the ambivalent, disturbing story of a mother who casts off her daughter in order to save her, and of a daughter who may never exorcise that abandonment.
Acts of mercy may have unforeseen consequences.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780307264237
  • ISBN-10: 0307264238
  • Publisher: Knopf Publishing Group
  • Publish Date: November 2008
  • Page Count: 167


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Literary

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 42.
  • Review Date: 2008-09-15
  • Reviewer: Staff

Nobel laureate Morrison returns more explicitly to the net of pain cast by slavery, a theme she detailed so memorably in Beloved. Set at the close of the 17th century, the book details America’s untoward foundation: dominion over Native Americans, indentured workers, women and slaves. A slave at a plantation in Maryland offers up her daughter, Florens, to a relatively humane Northern farmer, Jacob, as debt payment from their owner. The ripples of this choice spread to the inhabitants of Jacob’s farm, populated by women with intersecting and conflicting desires. Jacob’s wife, Rebekka, struggles with her faith as she loses one child after another to the harsh New World. A Native servant, Lina, survivor of a smallpox outbreak, craves Florens’s love to replace the family taken from her, and distrusts the other servant, a peculiar girl named Sorrow. When Jacob falls ill, all these women are threatened. Morrison’s lyricism infuses the shifting voices of her characters as they describe a brutal society being forged in the wilderness. Morrison’s unflinching narrative is all the more powerful for its relative brevity; it takes hold of the reader and doesn’t let go until the wrenching final-page crescendo. (Nov.)

 
BookPage Reviews

The moral dilemmas of freedom

There is the faintest whiff of the moralizer in the final pages of Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison's short but stunning new novel, A Mercy. There she solves the puzzle of why she has chosen the title of this heartrending book, in which shocking, unmerciful things happen to the vulnerable characters we most wish to protect.

The singular mercy Morrison invokes in the closing pages is itself agonizing and perplexing, a sort of Sophie's choice. But that mercy leads a reader to consider other, more profound questions: the spiritual costs of holding another human being in bondage; the costs of surrendering one's self-possession and responsibilities to others, thereby participating in one's own enslavement; the material and moral economies of freedom itself.

A Mercy is set in the 1680s and 1690s in the raw European settlements of Maryland and New York during the earliest years of the slave trade. Jacob Vaark, a self-made man, himself more or less an orphan, travels from Dutch-English New York to the Catholic colony of Maryland to collect a debt from an aristocratic plantation owner. He is offered the young slave girl Florens as partial payment of the debt, and partly out of empathy for the young girl, he accepts. Goodman Vaark is compromised by his decision and so, in her eagerness to be loved, is Florens. Similar moral ambiguities invest the other characters who appear in the novel: Lina, a Native American brought into the household after the devastation of her tribe; Sorrow, abandoned in the wreckage of a foundering ship; Rebekka, Vaark's bride, put out to marriage by her distressed family in England; and the artistic African blacksmith, a free man, with whom Florens falls so disastrously in love.

Morrison's story unfolds in overlapping perspectives and is carried forward by astonishingly beautiful, often incantatory language that summons vivid dreamscapes and suggests an American history that seems more emotionally and physically real than reality itself. In A Mercy, Morrison creates a vast living, breathing world in very few pages. It is a marvel.

Alden Mudge writes from Berkeley, California.

 
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