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Overview - Suzy and Nancy Goodman were more than sisters. They were best friends, confidantes, and partners in the grand adventure of life. For three decades, nothing could separate them. Not college, not marriage, not miles. Then Suzy got sick. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1977; three agonizing years later, at thirty-six, she died.  Read more...

 

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Overview
Suzy and Nancy Goodman were more than sisters. They were best friends, confidantes, and partners in the grand adventure of life. For three decades, nothing could separate them. Not college, not marriage, not miles. Then Suzy got sick. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1977; three agonizing years later, at thirty-six, she died. It wasn't supposed to be this way. The Goodman girls were raised in postwar Peoria, Illinois, by parents who believed that small acts of charity could change the world. Suzy was the big sister the homecoming queen with an infectious enthusiasm and a generous heart. Nancy was the little sister the tomboy with an outsized sense of justice who wanted to right all wrongs. The sisters shared makeup tips, dating secrets, plans for glamorous fantasy careers. They spent one memorable summer in Europe discovering a big world far from Peoria. They imagined a long life together one in which they'd grow old together surrounded by children and grandchildren. Suzy's diagnosis shattered that dream. In 1977, breast cancer was still shrouded in stigma and shame. Nobody talked about early detection and mammograms. Nobody could even say the words breast and cancer together in polite company, let alone on television news broadcasts. With Nancy at her side, Suzy endured the many indignities of cancer treatment, from the grim, soul-killing waiting rooms to the mistakes of well-meaning but misinformed doctors. That's when Suzy began to ask Nancy to promise. To promise to end the silence. To promise to raise money for scientific research. To promise to one day cure breast cancer for good. Big, shoot-for-the-moon promises that Nancy never dreamed she could fulfill. But she promised because this was her beloved sister. I promise, Suzy. . . . Even if it takes the rest of my life. Suzy's death both shocking and senseless created a deep pain in Nancy that never fully went away. But she soon found a useful outlet for her grief and o

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780307718129
  • ISBN-10: 0307718123
  • Publish Date: September 2010


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Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2010-08-23
  • Reviewer: Staff

Both Nancy and Susan Goodman, born in the mid-1940s to a businessman and his community-active wife in Peoria, Ill., developed breast cancer, and Suzy died from it at age 36 in 1980. Although she'd had a subcutaneous mastectomy two years before, her doctor did not follow through with chemotherapy or radiation. On a deathbed promise to her sister, Nancy (now Brinker) vowed to bring breast cancer out in the open, force people to "talk about it," and find funding for a cure. In this deeply thoughtful, assertive, sensitive memoir of the sisters' growing up and devotion to each other in life and death, Brinker chronicles the long path she trod to create Susan G. Komen for the Cure. With her marriage in 1981 to conservative Texas millionaire Norman Brinker, Nancy recognized she had a "platform" on which to build a foundation. High-profile breast-cancer cases such as Betty Ford's, Nancy Reagan's, and numerous others highlighted the cause, and in separate chapters Brinker delineates background and personal stories. (Sept.)

 
BookPage Reviews

Memoir of an inspiring cancer foe

Nancy G. Brinker, founder of Susan G. Komen for the Cure (SGK), says she is often asked why her world-famous foundation doesn’t have a grand, dedicated facility. Her answer typifies this remarkable woman’s laser-like focus: “Our greatest hope is . . . to eradicate breast cancer and close up shop. When the work is done, I’ll happily walk away . . . and celebrate the promise kept.”

That promise, a vow she made in the summer of 1980 to her dying sister Suzy, was that breast cancer would be brought out into the open—that all would be educated about this lethal disease; that women would be treated earlier and better; and that fewer women would die. Thirty years after Suzy’s death, Brinker is still working on that promise, an endeavor adeptly chronicled in the memoir (and so much more) Promise Me.

I had my doubts about this book: I am a stringent critic of memoir and am dubious about authors who require a professional co-writer in order to tell a story (in this case, the co-author is Joni Rodgers, whose many credits include Bald in the Land of Big Hair, about her diagnosis with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma). And then there was the grief factor. Like many of us, I have lost a loved one to breast cancer, and I read not a few pages through a blur of tears. But by the book’s end, I felt respect and gratitude for the herculean efforts of one fiercely determined woman and the worldwide advocacy she has engendered.

Brinker reveals her life story—with just the right amount of background included about her family, her special relationship with her sister and her own breast cancer diagnosis—but balances this with other women’s poignant stories of life with breast cancer. The crisp narrative, interwoven with SGK’s history, growth, achievements and milestones, also tracks the progress of breast cancer research treatment and developments and includes a resource list for women coping with cancer. An interesting sub-storyline, which includes a mini-management primer, follows Brinker’s relationship with her former husband, millionaire Norman Brinker, and how his personality, ethics and business principles informed how she has built, marketed and sustained SGK.

Hats off—and pink ribbons on—to Nancy Brinker and Joni Rodgers for this inspiring book.

 

 
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