Poe : A Life Cut Short
by Peter Ackroyd


Overview -

Gothic, mysterious, theatrical, fatally flawed, and dazzling, the life of Edgar Allan Poe, one of America's greatest and most versatile writers, is the ideal subject for Peter Ackroyd. Poe wrote lyrical poetry and macabre psychological melodramas; invented the first fictional detective; and produced pioneering works of science fiction and fantasy.  Read more...


 
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More About Poe by Peter Ackroyd
 
 
 
Overview

Gothic, mysterious, theatrical, fatally flawed, and dazzling, the life of Edgar Allan Poe, one of America's greatest and most versatile writers, is the ideal subject for Peter Ackroyd. Poe wrote lyrical poetry and macabre psychological melodramas; invented the first fictional detective; and produced pioneering works of science fiction and fantasy. His innovative style, images, and themes had a tremendous impact on European romanticism, symbolism, and surrealism, and continue to influence writers today.
In this essential addition to his canon of acclaimed biographies, Peter Ackroyd explores Poe's literary accomplishments and legacy against the background of his erratic, dramatic, and sometimes sordid life. Ackroyd chronicles Poe's difficult childhood, his bumpy academic and military careers, and his complex relationships with women, including his marriage to his thirteen-year-old cousin. He describes Poe's much-written-about problems with gambling and alcohol with sympathy and insight, showing their connections to Poe's childhood and the trials, as well as the triumphs, of his adult life. Ackroyd's thoughtful, perceptive examinations of some of Poe's most famous works shed new light on these classics and on the troubled and brilliant genius who created them.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780385508001
  • ISBN-10: 038550800X
  • Publisher: Nan A. Talese
  • Publish Date: January 2009
  • Page Count: 205
  • Dimensions: 7.1 x 5.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.65 pounds

Series: Ackroyd's Brief Lives

Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Literary

 
BookPage Reviews

Happy 200th, Mr. Poe

British biographer and novelist Peter Ackroyd offers a scaled-down biography, Poe: A Life Cut Short, the latest in the Ackroyd's Brief Lives series. Given the book's concision, Ackroyd does an admirable job touching the highlights of EAP's life—though perhaps lowlights would be a more apt phrase, since so many of Poe's 40 years were spent in emotional despair and financial penury.

There have been a lot of Poe biographies, and known details of Poe's life and death have been well-documented: the desertion by his father and the death of his mother when he was still a boy; his affection for his adopted mother, Fanny Allan, and his fractious relationship with her husband, John; his short stint at West Point; his marriage to his 13-year-old cousin, Virginia Clemm, who, like his mother, would suffer from tuberculosis and die at a very early age; his own mysterious death in Baltimore. Ackroyd adds nothing new to the story, but instead contents himself with sketching a portrait of the artist behind some of the most original and influential stories and poems in the American canon.

Poe is thin on literary criticism and heavy on psychology. The study is, by necessity, inconclusive. "What was his character, in the most general sense?" Ackroyd wonders. "He has alternately been described as ambitious and unworldly, jealous and restrained, childlike and theatrical, fearful and vicious, self-confident and wayward, defiant and self-pitying. He was all these and more."

Mostly, Poe was a writer like none before or since, and while largely underappreciated and financially unrewarded during his lifetime (although Ackroyd reminds us that he had devoted followers and "The Raven" was an instant classic), his reputation started to grow immediately after his death. The tentacles of his influence stretch far and wide, to what we now call horror or gothic fiction, but also to science fiction and mystery (many credit Poe with inventing the detective story with "The Murders in the Rue Morgue.") Celebrating this lineage, the Mystery Writers of America, whose annual prizes are named in Poe's honor, has published two new anthologies that call upon the talents of some of the group's more prominent members.

 
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