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Packing for Mars : The Curious Science of Life in the Void
by Mary Roach

Overview - Space is a world devoid of the things we need to live and thrive: air, gravity, hot showers, fresh produce, privacy, beer. Space exploration is in some ways an exploration of what it means to be human. How much can a person give up? How much weirdness can they take?  Read more...

 
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More About Packing for Mars by Mary Roach
 
 
 
Overview
Space is a world devoid of the things we need to live and thrive: air, gravity, hot showers, fresh produce, privacy, beer. Space exploration is in some ways an exploration of what it means to be human. How much can a person give up? How much weirdness can they take? What happens to you when you can t walk for a year? have sex? smell flowers? What happens if you vomit in your helmet during a space walk? Is it possible for the human body to survive a bailout at 17,000 miles per hour? To answer these questions, space agencies set up all manner of quizzical and startlingly bizarre space simulations. As Mary Roach discovers, it s possible to preview space without ever leaving Earth. From the space shuttle training toilet to a crash test of NASA s new space capsule (cadaver filling in for astronaut), Roach takes us on a surreally entertaining trip into the science of life in space and space on Earth."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780393068474
  • ISBN-10: 0393068471
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • Publish Date: August 2010
  • Page Count: 334


Related Categories

Books > Science > Space Science
Books > Technology > Aeronautics & Astronautics

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2010-09-27
  • Reviewer: Staff

Roach (Stiff) once again proves herself the ideal guide to a parallel universe. Despite all the high-tech science that has resulted in space shuttles and moonwalks, the most crippling hurdles of cosmic travel are our most primordial human qualities: eating, going to the bathroom, having sex and bathing, and not dying in reentry. Readers learn that throwing up in a space helmet could be life-threatening, that Japanese astronaut candidates must fold a thousand origami paper cranes to test perseverance and attention to detail, and that cadavers are gaining popularity over crash dummies when studying landings. Roach's humor and determined curiosity keep the journey lively, and her profiles of former astronauts are especially telling. However, larger questions about the "worth" or potential benefits of space travel remain ostensibly unasked, effectively rendering these wild and well-researched facts to the status of trivia. Previously, Roach engaged in topics everyone could relate to. Unlike having sex or being dead, though, space travel pertains only to a few, leaving the rest of us unsure what it all amounts to. Still, the chance to float in zero gravity, even if only vicariously, can be surprising in what it reveals about us. (Aug.)

 
BookPage Reviews

Jaw-dropping, gravity-defying facts

Mary Roach has a penchant for tracking down the answers to the questions you never knew you had about the human body. People reading her books often wear the same expressions as people watching gory movies. Her sideways curiosity has led her to write about the fate of cadavers (Stiff) and the science of sex (Bonk). With Packing for Mars, she investigates what happens to our normally earthbound selves when we’re blasted off into zero gravity. It’s an utterly fascinating account, made all the more entertaining by the author’s ever-amused tone.

Roach takes enormous delight in what she does. Not surprising, considering that what she does leads her to chat about things like “fecal popcorn” and in-helmet upchucking, and the fact that only half the human population is capable of lighting its farts. Who wouldn’t have fun asking strait-laced NASA scientists to explain how one gets a “good seal” on a space toilet? Clearly, this is not your typical sober examination of the mission to conquer space. Roach is interested in heroics and technological awesomeness, but she’s even more interested in what those things do to humble human bodies. Accordingly, she homes in on the most bizarre and surprising details in the history of space travel.

Of course, it’s not all about the gags. Roach has a larger theme underlying her frequently goofy presentation: “One of the things I love about manned space exploration,” she writes, “is that it forces people to unlace certain notions of what is and isn’t acceptable.” The difficulties and indignities of space travel, she argues, are worthwhile because they teach us what is possible—they bring “a back-handed nobility” to our wilder ambitions. They remind us that wacky, silly, fun things can also be profoundly important. Laugh and learn.

 
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