Coupon
The Book of Men : Poems
by Dorianne Laux


Overview - from "To Kiss Frank, make out with him a bit, this is what my friend would like to d oh these too many dead summers later and as much as I want to stroll with he into the poet's hazy fanc all I can see is O'Hara's long gone lip fallen free of the bone, slumberin beneath the grainy soil   Read more...

 
Hardcover
  • $24.95
Sorry: This item is not currently available.

Free Shipping is not available for this item.
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 17 copies from $17.43
 
 
 
 

More About The Book of Men by Dorianne Laux
 
 
 
Overview
from "To Kiss Frank, make out with him a bit, this is what my friend would like to d oh these too many dead summers later and as much as I want to stroll with he into the poet's hazy fanc all I can see is O'Hara's long gone lip fallen free of the bone, slumberin beneath the grainy soil

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780393079555
  • ISBN-10: 0393079554
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • Publish Date: February 2011
  • Page Count: 96
  • Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.7 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.52 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Poetry > American - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2010-12-20
  • Reviewer: Staff

Laux's fifth collection continues in her descriptive, storytelling vein: the at-hand, the matter-of-fact, the day-to-day are rendered in an earnest tone both sensuous and nostalgic. Something of a baby boomer's field guide, this book portrays the legacy of the 1960s from the perspective of one who has survived and must look back on what that decade did and didn't change. And so, the Vietnam War, Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Mick Jagger, Cher, Frank O'Hara, and Superman all make appearances. Laux's treatment of this era isn't without sentimentality, but her true aim is more probing, more elegiac: Superman "sits on a tall building/ smoking pot, holding white plumes in,/ palliative for the cancerous green glow/ spreading its tentacles"; "It's 2010 and the doctors have given him another year in Metropolis." Laux's younger self has grown up, no longer that girl who knew "it was the summer of love/ and I wore nothing under my cotton vest,/ my Mexican skirt." Laux brings the book toward its close reconsidering women's bodies—specifically their breasts—and how they change: "your mother's are strangers to you now, your sister's/ were always bigger.../ your lover's breasts, deep under the ground,/ you weep beside the little mounds of earth/ lightly shoveled over them." (Feb.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews