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Buckley and Mailer : The Difficult Friendship That Shaped the Sixties
by Kevin M. Schultz


Overview -

William F. Buckley, Jr., and Norman Mailer were the two towering intellectual figures of the 1960s, and they lived remarkably parallel lives. Both became best-selling authors in their twenties (with God and Man at Yale and The Naked and the Dead ); both started hugely influential papers ( National Review and the Village Voice ); both ran for mayor of New York City; both were noted for their exceptional wit and venom; and both became the figurehead of their respective social movements (Buckley on the right, Mailer on the left).  Read more...


 
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More About Buckley and Mailer by Kevin M. Schultz
 
 
 
Overview

William F. Buckley, Jr., and Norman Mailer were the two towering intellectual figures of the 1960s, and they lived remarkably parallel lives. Both became best-selling authors in their twenties (with God and Man at Yale and The Naked and the Dead); both started hugely influential papers (National Review and the Village Voice); both ran for mayor of New York City; both were noted for their exceptional wit and venom; and both became the figurehead of their respective social movements (Buckley on the right, Mailer on the left). Indeed, Buckley and Mailer argued vociferously and publicly about every major issue of their time: civil rights, feminism, the counterculture, Vietnam, the Cold War. But behind the scenes, the two were close friends and trusted confidantes. In Buckley and Mailer, historian Kevin M. Schultz delves into their personal archives to tell the rich story of their friendship, their arguments, and the tumultuous decade they did so much to shape.

Here is the entertaining and deeply American story of what Mailer himself called a "difficult friendship": from their debate before the Floyd Patterson-Sonny Liston heavyweight fight in 1962 to their failed mayoral campaigns, to their confrontation at Truman Capote's Black-and-White Ball, to their starring roles in the central events of the '60s, including the giant antiwar rally in Berkeley, the March on the Pentagon, and the national political conventions in Miami and Chicago. Through it all, Schultz charts their friendship, whether sailing together off the coast of Connecticut, celebrating rave reviews and grousing about lousy ones, and defending each other's decisions privately even as they attack each other's positions publicly.

Brimming with Buckley and Mailer's own thoughts from their personal diaries and letters, Buckley and Mailer also features cameos by other leading figures of the time, including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Barry Goldwater, Robert F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Gloria Steinem, and Gore Vidal. Schultz delivers a fresh chronicle of the '60s and its long aftermath as well as an enormously engaging work of narrative history that explores these extraordinary figures' contrasting visions of what America was and what it could be.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780393088717
  • ISBN-10: 0393088715
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • Publish Date: June 2015
  • Page Count: 400
  • Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Editors, Journalists, Publishers
Books > History > United States - 20th Century
Books > Biography & Autobiography > Literary

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-03-09
  • Reviewer: Staff

University of Illinois historian Schultz’s social history unfolds as Norman Mailer and William F. Buckley—heroes of the left and right, respectively—get to know one another in 1962 and become “near-allies in the battle to overturn the Liberal Establishment.” The book is not a dual biography, nor does it span entire careers: it ends in 1969, with Mailer’s entry into the New York City mayoral race when he was 46 and Buckley was 41. Mailer emerges as the adored protagonist, an all-around mensch, and the political prophet of the radical left. Buckley is treated more formally and critically. The book’s central premise—that Mailer and Buckley were trusted confidants—is a stretch. Schultz also dwells fondly on cafe intellectuals and glamorous literary celebrities—such as Truman Capote, whose exploits are amply covered elsewhere—at some expense to the book’s seriousness. Nevertheless, this “difficult friendship,” as Mailer called it, illuminates the decade’s larger cultural context. Mailer and Buckley were bright, magnetic intellectual leaders and publicity hounds with superhuman energy; both loved America but in different ways. Schultz navigates the 1960s through these two larger-than-life men, offering plentiful anecdotes in an informed, entertaining style. (June)

 
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