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Inside Out : Portrait of an Eating Disorder
by Nadia Shivack

Overview - "Every day, meal by meal, millions of people suffer from eating disorders. I am one of them."
Nadia Shivack was fourteen years old when she met Ed, her eating disorder. Sometimes like an alien in her body, sometimes like a lover, Ed was unpredictable and exciting, but ultimately always dangerous and destructive.
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More About Inside Out by Nadia Shivack
 
 
 
Overview
"Every day, meal by meal, millions of people suffer from eating disorders. I am one of them."
Nadia Shivack was fourteen years old when she met Ed, her eating disorder. Sometimes like an alien in her body, sometimes like a lover, Ed was unpredictable and exciting, but ultimately always dangerous and destructive.
At an inpatient unit unit of a hospital where she was taken for treatment, Nadia wrote and drew on napkins after meals in order to keep the food in and calm the outrageous voices in her head. These pictures, together with others drawn on notebook paper and a variety of other surfaces, tell an unflinchingly honest story of a woman's lifelong battle with anorexia and bulimia. Raw, brave, and brilliant, Nadia's journey takes readers to the intimate corners of these misunderstood diseases. You will never think about eating disorders in the same way again.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780689852169
  • ISBN-10: 0689852169
  • Publisher: Ginee Seo Books
  • Publish Date: July 2007
  • Page Count: 64
  • Reading Level: Ages 12-17


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Biography & Autobiography - General
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Social Issues - Depression & Mental Illness

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 56.
  • Review Date: 2007-07-09
  • Reviewer: Staff

In this heartfelt, honest memoir, the author uses a graphic novel format to reveal her anguished, ongoing struggle with bulimia. Shivack’s story unfolds largely through rudimentary drawings with captions and speech balloons, many created on paper napkins while she was being treated for her eating disorder. Setting the scene, the author initially depicts her rather contentious relationship with her mother, a Holocaust survivor who “had very strong ideas about food,” insisting that her three daughters finish everything on their dinner plates even though she herself ate only once a day (“just enough to keep herself going, not a bite more”). Shivack notes that her eating disorder (which she depicts as a monster named “Ed”) started when she began swimming competitively in high school—her coach criticized those swimmers who needed to lose weight. Feeling a part of that category, Shivack launched a regimen of binging, purging and compulsive exercising. In a poignant drawing, she likens her daily routine as a teen to a perilous climb up a steep, jagged mountain. Her dizzying downward spiral is sobering indeed, as her bulimia takes over her life and she becomes suicidal. Yet Shivack ends on a hopeful note, vowing, as an adult, to continue on her road to recovery. Statistics about eating disorders are found throughout the book, which concludes with a list of resources. Though intensely personal and—perhaps of necessity—repetitious, this harrowing chronicle may well provide support and solace to teens facing a similar crisis. Ages 12-up. (July)

 
BookPage Reviews

Dinner with Ed

At age 14, Nadia Shivack developed an eating disorder. She named it Ed, which tells you something about her whimsical and humorous approach to a serious problem. Later, as an inpatient treated for anorexia and bulimia, Nadia drew illustrations of her battles with and capitulations to Ed on napkins and notepads after meals, in order to calm her mind and distract herself from thinking about food. Those drawings have been adapted into a fascinating and refreshingly honest account of her struggle, Inside Out: Portrait of an Eating Disorder. In addition to being beautiful to look at, the book includes a page of resources with information for others who deal with anorexia and bulimia. The author's hope is that by getting the subject out in the open, she can ensure that other girls won't feel they have to keep it hidden the way she did. And with Inside Out, she succeeds brilliantly in accomplishing this goal.

 
BAM Customer Reviews

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