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A Monster Calls
by Patrick Ness and Jim Kay

Overview - An unflinching, darkly funny, and deeply moving story of a boy, his seriously ill mother, and an unexpected monstrous visitor. From the final idea of award-winning author Siobhan Dowd--whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself--Ness has spun a haunting and darkly funny novel of mischief, loss, and monsters both real and imagined.  Read more...

 
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More About A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness; Jim Kay
 
 
 
Overview
An unflinching, darkly funny, and deeply moving story of a boy, his seriously ill mother, and an unexpected monstrous visitor. From the final idea of award-winning author Siobhan Dowd--whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself--Ness has spun a haunting and darkly funny novel of mischief, loss, and monsters both real and imagined. Illustrations.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780763655594
  • ISBN-10: 0763655597
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press (MA)
  • Publish Date: September 2011
  • Page Count: 204
  • Reading Level: Ages 12-UP


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Social Issues - Death & Dying
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Family - Parents
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Monsters

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-06-20
  • Reviewer: Staff

In his introduction to this profoundly moving, expertly crafted tale of unaccountable loss, Ness explains how he developed the story from a set of notes left by Siobhan Dowd, who died in 2007 before she had completed a first draft. "I felt—and feel—as if I've been handed a baton, like a particularly fine writer has given me her story and said, ‘Go. Run with it. Make trouble.' " What Ness has produced is a singular masterpiece, exceptionally well-served by Kay's atmospheric and ominous illustrations. Conor O'Malley is 13. His mother is being treated for cancer; his father, Liam, has remarried and lives in America; and Conor is left in the care of a grandmother who cares more for her antique wall clock than her grandson. This grim existence is compounded by bullies at school who make fun of his mother's baldness, and an actual nightmare that wakes Conor, screaming, on a recurring basis. Then comes the monster—part human, part arboreal—a hulking yew tree that walks to his window just after midnight and tells three inscrutable parables, each of which disappoints Conor because the good guy is continually wronged. "Many things that are true feel like a cheat," the monster explains. In return for the monster's stories, Conor must tell his own, and the monster demands it be true, forcing Conor, a good boy, a dutiful son, to face up to his feelings: rage and, worse still, fear. If one point of writing is to leave something that transcends human existence, Ness has pulled a fast one on the Grim Reaper, finishing the story death kept Dowd from giving us. It is a story that not only does honor to her memory, it tackles the toughest of subjects by refusing to flinch, meeting the ugly truth about life head-on with compassion, bravery, and insight. Ages 12–up. (Sept.)

 
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