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The Summer of the Bear
by Bella Pollen

Overview - With her fifth novel, critically acclaimed writer and journalist Pollen takes readers into the private dynamics of a family grappling with the loss of a father and husband in Scotland's Outer Hebrides, where, between elemental beauty and utter bleakness, strange forces are at play.  Read more...

 
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More About The Summer of the Bear by Bella Pollen
 
 
 
Overview
With her fifth novel, critically acclaimed writer and journalist Pollen takes readers into the private dynamics of a family grappling with the loss of a father and husband in Scotland's Outer Hebrides, where, between elemental beauty and utter bleakness, strange forces are at play.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780802119742
  • ISBN-10: 0802119743
  • Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press
  • Publish Date: June 2011
  • Page Count: 441


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Literary

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-02-28
  • Reviewer: Staff

The Fleming family, having lost father and husband Nicky, a cold war-era British diplomat, in a mysterious accident early in this satisfying novel (after Midnight Cactus), leaves the embassy at Bonn for refuge in Scotland's Outer Hebrides. There they begin parallel lives, dealing with their grief separately and stumblingly as a number of threats to the family slowly mount. Of the children, Jamie, the youngest, wildly imaginative and cosseted by grownups, is forced to make his own sense of his father's disappearance; acerbic Alba is overcome with anger; and quiet, dutiful Georgie is simply set adrift. Then there's Letty, their mother, who retreats almost entirely as her grief becomes increasingly painful and she is forced to confront new and disturbing possibilities about her husband, namely, that he may have been involved in treasonous activities. The drama intensifies as an escaped bear haunts the narrative periphery and the Flemings' home becomes threatened by government development projects. Everything comes together, perhaps too neatly, but the real draw is Pollen's show-stealing, fantastic portrayal of the underparented children. (June)

 
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