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Thanksgiving : How to Cook It Well
by Sam Sifton and Sarah C. Rutherford

Overview - NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY EATER.COM
From one of America's finest food writers, the former restaurant critic for "The New York Times, "comes a definitive, timeless guide to Thanksgiving dinner--preparing it, surviving it, and pulling it off in style.
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More About Thanksgiving by Sam Sifton; Sarah C. Rutherford
 
 
 
Overview
NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY EATER.COM
From one of America's finest food writers, the former restaurant critic for "The New York Times, "comes a definitive, timeless guide to Thanksgiving dinner--preparing it, surviving it, and pulling it off in style.
From the planning of the meal to the washing of the last plate, Thanksgiving poses more--and more vexing--problems for the home cook than any other holiday. In this smartly written, beautifully illustrated, recipe-filled book, Sam Sifton, the "Times"'s resident Thanksgiving expert, delivers a message of great comfort and solace: There is no need for fear. You can cook a great meal on Thanksgiving. You can have a great time.
With simple, fool-proof recipes for classic Thanksgiving staples, as well as new takes on old standbys, this book will show you that the fourth Thursday of November does not have to be a day of kitchen stress and family drama, of dry stuffing and sad, cratered pies. You can make a better turkey than anyone has ever served you in your life, and you can serve it with gravy that is not lumpy or bland but a salty balm, rich in flavor, that transforms all it touches. Here are recipes for exciting side dishes and robust pies and festive cocktails, instructions for setting the table and setting the mood, as well as cooking techniques and menu ideas that will serve you all year long, whenever you are throwing a big party. Written for novice and experienced cooks alike, "Thanksgiving: How to Cook It Well" is your guide to making Thanksgiving the best holiday of the year. It is not fantasy. If you prepare, it will happen. And this book will show you how.
Advance praise for "Thanksgiving"
" "
"If you don't have "Thanksgiving, " you are not really having Thanksgiving. This book is as essential to the day as the turkey itself. It's an expert, gently opinionated guide to everything from the cranberry sauce to the table setting to the divvying up of the leftovers, but it's also a paean to the holiday and an evocation of both its past and its promising future. Sam Sifton's Thanksgiving world is the one I want to live in."--Gabrielle Hamilton, bestselling author of "Blood, Bones, & Butter"
"The charm of Sam Sifton's "Thanksgiving" is that he proposes that home cooks treat this culinary Olympics like any other dinner party--don't panic, deconstruct your tasks into bite-size pieces, and conquer that fear of failure. Sam could talk a fledgling doctor through his first open-heart surgery. It's all here--from brining to spatchcocking, sides to desserts--and served up with a generous dollop of reassuring advice from one of America's most notable food writers."--Christopher Kimball, editor of "Cook's Illustrated" and host of "America's Test Kitchen"

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781400069910
  • ISBN-10: 1400069912
  • Publisher: Random House
  • Publish Date: October 2012
  • Page Count: 133


Related Categories

Books > Cooking > Holiday - General
Books > Cooking > Entertaining - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-09-17
  • Reviewer: Staff

Sifton, the national editor for the New York Times and its former restaurant critic, talks turkey, as well as gravy, cranberry, side dishes, and table settings in this wonderful holiday survival guide. The author describes how to “cook Thanksgiving correctly,” as he spells out the proper way to plan the feast and includes variations on all the classic dishes. Words of wisdom include forgoing appetizers, unless those appetizers happen to be oysters. Recipes include gingered cranberry sauce, creamed brussels sprouts, six different ways to cook a turkey, and four ways to use it in leftovers. As a critic, Sifton would delight his readers by employing a mix of lush and simple imagery, plus a poet’s ear for rhythm. Of a favorite entrée at a Greenwich Village restaurant, he once wrote, “The beans were creamy and substantial, their velvet richness augmented by the plush ermine nature of the peppers.” While his book is intended to be instructional, Sifton displays glimpses of this lyricism throughout, all the while maintaining a playful good nature: “The dessert need not be extravagant. It absolutely should not be experimental. Nor should it be overly cute.” (Oct.)

 
BookPage Reviews

An international trifecta

Though we’ve become a global village, we still eat and cook in wonderfully diverse ways. Now three new, beautifully illustrated cookbooks take us on eye-opening, mouthwatering culinary journeys.

Maricel E. Presilla’s Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America, with more than 500 recipes that roam through the rich gastronomic landscapes of Latin America from Mexico to the tip of Argentina, is a feast and a fiesta. As you cook your way through adobos, sofritos, empanadas, tangy ceviches, “big” soups and little snacks, meat and poultry (grilled, roasted and braised), salads, condiments and dulces, you’ll discover how the fusion of native and Iberian cooking customs has made la cocina Latina so deliciously complex.

When it comes to conjuring up the splendors—edible and otherwise—of exotic places, nobody does it better than Naomi Duguid. With Burma: Rivers of Flavor, she opens up the culinary culture of a country that’s long been a crossroads for traders and travelers from China, India and all of Southeast Asia. A celebration of place, people and traditional foodways in vibrant recipes, dazzling photographs and stories that reveal the heart of a land, Burma is a must, and a perfect gift, for cooks and travelers—armchair or actual.

Leanne Kitchen (great name for a food writer!) takes on a varied, venerable cuisine in Turkey. With more than 100 recipes, and photographs that you’ll want to bite into, she offers an elegant cook’s tour of Turkey’s seven geographic regions, where Mediterranean, Slavic and Middle Eastern influences mingle and where courtly Ottoman dishes share the Turkish table with more humble, hearty peasant fare.

TOP PICK IN COOKBOOKS
Whether you’ve cooked a ton of turkeys or are facing your first—Do Not Proceed without Thanksgiving: How to Cook It Well, Sam Sifton’s charming, absolutely essential manual. Sifton, a former New York Times restaurant critic, spent many Thanksgiving Days as a guardian angel, answering the newspaper’s Thanksgiving help line, saving the desperate from all sorts of disasters. He not only knows his stuff (and stuffing), he loves and honors the tradition, its promise and its joyful indulgence. But he’s strict about the rules: You will make turkey, gravy and cranberry sauce (a non-negotiable trio), offer more than one starch, more than one appropriate-to-the-season veg and classic desserts (not chocolate, not experimental), no salad, no appetizers, save a few briny oysters. Sifton says, “Thanksgiving ought to be the best holiday of the year,” and he gives the guidance, the indispensable recipes and the moral support you need to cook a great holiday feast (leftovers included) and not lose your mind!

 
BAM Customer Reviews

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