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The Monsters of Templeton
by Lauren Groff

Overview - Wilhelmina Cooper is told that the key to her biological fathers identity lies somewhere in her familys history. She buries herself in the research of her twisted family tree and finds that a chorus of voices from the towns past--some sinister, all fascinating--rises up around her to tell their side of the story.  Read more...

 
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More About The Monsters of Templeton by Lauren Groff
 
 
 
Overview
Wilhelmina Cooper is told that the key to her biological fathers identity lies somewhere in her familys history. She buries herself in the research of her twisted family tree and finds that a chorus of voices from the towns past--some sinister, all fascinating--rises up around her to tell their side of the story.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781401322250
  • ISBN-10: 1401322255
  • Publisher: Hyperion Books
  • Publish Date: February 2008
  • Page Count: 361


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Sagas

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 27.
  • Review Date: 2007-11-26
  • Reviewer: Staff

At the start of Groff’s lyrical debut, 28-year-old Wilhelmina “Willie” Upton returns to her picturesque hometown of Templeton, N.Y., after a disastrous affair with her graduate school professor during an archeological dig in Alaska. In Templeton, Willie’s shocked to find that her once-bohemian mother, Vi, has found religion. Vi also reveals to Willie that her father wasn’t a nameless hippie from Vi’s commune days, but a man living in Templeton. With only the scantiest of clues from Vi, Willie is determined to untangle the roots of the town’s greatest families and discover her father’s identity. Brilliantly incorporating accounts from generations of Templetonians—as well as characters “borrowed” from the works of James Fenimore Cooper, who named an upstate New York town “Templeton” in The Pioneers—Groff paints a rich picture of Willie’s current predicaments and those of her ancestors. Readers will delight in Willie’s sharp wit and Groff’s creation of an entire world, complete with a lake monster and illegitimate children. (Feb.)

 
BookPage Reviews

A family history

Lauren Groff's exuberant debut follows in the footsteps of notable first novels like Marisha Pessl's Special Topics in Calamity Physics and Jonathan Safran Foer's Everything Is Illuminated with its blend of illustrations, photographs and text. And like the main characters of Foer and Pessl, Groff's quirky protagonist, 28-year-old Willie Upton, is trying to solve a mystery about her past. Luckily, The Monsters of Templeton also marks the appearance of an original talent that can stand on its own in comparison to these literary heavyweights.

As the novel opens, Willie has returned to Templeton, New York, after a disastrous affair with her doctoral advisor at Stanford. Her disgrace is a disappointment to her mother, Vi, who had come back to town under similar conditions before Willie's birth. To jar Willie out of her depression, Vi shares a shocking revelation: Willie's birth was not the result of a one-night stand with a fellow hippie in a commune, as Willie had always supposed, but a one-night stand with a now-married Templeton resident. However, Vi refuses to tell Willie who her father is. Her only clue is that he, like Vi, was descended from the town's founder, Marmaduke Temple.

Far from being a dull geneaology search, Willie's quest for her biological father unearths such remarkable ancestors as Cinnamon and Charlotte, distant cousins whose ladylike correspondence leads to blackmail and betrayal; the "extraordinarily hirsute" Richard Temple; and a mute Indian girl, Noname. As she sorts through the past, Willie uncovers secrets galore but also learns to deal with her present-day problems.

Templeton is based on Groff's hometown of Cooperstown, which was founded by James Fenimore Cooper (who bears a passing resemblance to Marmaduke Temple). Groff's writing is ambitious, playful, intelligent and never dull; she adroitly hops backward and forward in time and assumes different narrative voices—including that of Templeton's famous lake monster, who knows all the town's secrets. Readers will emphathize with Willie as she discovers that while the past is important, the present is what you make it.

 
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