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A Memory of Trains : The Boll Weevil & Others
by Jr. Louis Decimus Rubin and Jr. Louis Decimus Rubin

Overview - This is the way that Louis D. Rubin, Jr., remembers steam railroading during the days when trains were still the dominant mode of American intercity travel. In the years after the Second World War, as a young newspaperman, he spent much of his time riding and photographing trains.  Read more...

 
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More About A Memory of Trains by Jr. Louis Decimus Rubin; Jr. Louis Decimus Rubin
 
 
 
Overview
This is the way that Louis D. Rubin, Jr., remembers steam railroading during the days when trains were still the dominant mode of American intercity travel. In the years after the Second World War, as a young newspaperman, he spent much of his time riding and photographing trains. It was a time when coal-powered Iron Horses were giving way to diesel-electric locomotives.

Railfans and general readers alike will enjoy this memoir featuring more than one hundred of Rubin's photographs. This account tells of the role that railroads and railroading played in his life as a child and youth and as an adult in search of a vocation.

Rubin began his lifelong engagement with trains in the Carolinas and Virginia, then journeyed westward to the Appalachians, northward to Maryland, New Jersey, and the Northeast, and then into the Deep South, the Midwest, and the Far West. The text and photographs of A Memory of Trains recount that journey.

There was one train that Rubin had yet to travel aboard or photograph: the Boll Weevil, which made the Hamlet-to-Charleston run during his childhood. His account of the day he finally arrived at the station in Hamlet to ride it and his exploration of what the little train meant for him constitute a poignant episode in this memoir of railroads and railroading.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781570033827
  • ISBN-10: 157003382X
  • Publisher: University of South Carolina Press
  • Publish Date: November 2000
  • Page Count: 182


Related Categories

Books > Transportation > Railroads - History

 
BookPage Reviews

Louis D. Rubin, Jr., shares a delightful tale of his professional coming of age amid the closing of a wondrous era in American railroading in his latest book, A Memory of Trains. A retired journalist and professor of Southern literature, he shares stories and photographs that illuminate the years after the Second World War.

After being discharged from the military, Rubin returned home to South Carolina, hoping to embark on a career in journalism. Over the next few years, his plans changed as he worked on local papers in New Jersey and Virginia.

All the time he was writing and editing articles, Rubin was indulging a lifelong passion for trains. Primarily, that meant spending leisure hours taking photographs of steam and diesel locomotives, crack passenger trains and unheralded freights in a variety of eastern and southern states on an assortment of railroads. Adding poignancy to Rubin's account is the fact that, as he came to realize, a significant period was drawing to a close in the 1940s and '50s. The demise of the steam locomotive, replaced by the sleeker and more efficient diesel, coincided with the general shift in travel away from the train.

Changes in travel brought social and cultural changes that transformed America, the author's native South in particular. The sense of isolation that characterized the towns where Rubin lived and worked was breaking down. Soon the small papers he knew so well would vanish, swallowed up by regional and national chains. And the railroads he admired would lose their identities through mergers.

While chronicling these momentous changes and lamenting much of what was being lost, Rubin also describes his own coming of age. We see him gain confidence in his writing, endure loneliness before meeting the woman he marries, and decide to leave journalism for college teaching.

Dozens of the author's photos accompany the well-written chapters. A Memory of Trains will leave readers saddened by all that disappeared when railroads lost their grandeur, but they will appreciate the memories this autobiography stirs.

Roger Carp is on the staff ofClassic Toy Trains magazine.

 
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