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Harvesting Color : How to Find Plants and Make Natural Dyes
by Rebecca Burgess


Overview -

Selection of the Crafters' Choice Book Club

Beautiful natural dyes from plants found in the wild or grown in your own backyard.

As more and more crafters are discovering, dyeing your own fabric can yield gorgeous colors. Now master dyer Rebecca Burgess identifies 36 plants that will yield beautiful natural shades and shows how easy it is to make the dyes.  Read more...


 
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More About Harvesting Color by Rebecca Burgess
 
 
 
Overview

Selection of the Crafters' Choice Book Club

Beautiful natural dyes from plants found in the wild or grown in your own backyard.

As more and more crafters are discovering, dyeing your own fabric can yield gorgeous colors. Now master dyer Rebecca Burgess identifies 36 plants that will yield beautiful natural shades and shows how easy it is to make the dyes. Pokeweed creates a vibrant magenta, while a range of soft lavender shades is created from elderberries; indigo yields a bright blue, and coyote brush creates stunning sunny yellows.

Gathering Color explains where to find these plants in the wild (and for those that can be grown in your backyard, how to nurture them) and the best time and way to harvest them; maps show the range of each plant in the United States and Canada. For the dyeing itself, Burgess describes the simple equipment needed and provides a master dye recipe. The book is organized seasonally; as an added bonus, each section contains a knitting project using wools colored with dyes from plants harvested during that time of the year. With breathtaking color photographs by Paige Green throughout, Gathering Color is an essential guide to this growing field, for crafters and DIYers; for ecologists and botanists; and for artists, textile designers, and art students.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781579654252
  • ISBN-10: 1579654258
  • Publisher: Artisan Publishers
  • Publish Date: May 2011
  • Page Count: 180
  • Dimensions: 7.96 x 10.02 x 0.63 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.65 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Crafts & Hobbies > Dye
Books > Crafts & Hobbies > Nature Crafts

 
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COLOR TO DYE FOR
Harvesting Color: How To Find Plants and Make Natural Dyes by Rebecca Burgess is a treat for dyed-in-the-wool lovers of curious lore and a beautiful resource for folks who work with textiles, as well as for gardeners or artisans interested in how to plumb nature for vibrant colors. As the author says, “the return to natural dyes after 150 years of relying on synthetics is garnering increased interest from a wide variety of environmentalists, farmers and do-it-yourself crafters.” Organized by season, Harvesting Color highlights 36 dye plants easily cultivated or foraged. These range from the ubiquitous pokeberry and black walnut to the geographically specific cochineal, an insect whose dried, crushed bodies have supplied dyers with pure scarlet since Aztec times. A resource guide helps readers find local sources by state. Each plant profile includes uses (historic and current), where to find it, when and how to harvest it and a master dye recipe. 

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