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Hiding Out at the Pancake Palace
by Nan Marino

Overview - In "Hiding Out at the Pancake Palace "by Nan Marino, eleven-year-old musical prodigy, Elvis Ruby, was supposed to win the most coveted reality show on television, "Tween Star." None of the other contestants even came close to his talents. But in the middle of the biggest night, with millions of people watching, Elvis panicked.  Read more...

 
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More About Hiding Out at the Pancake Palace by Nan Marino
 
 
 
Overview
In "Hiding Out at the Pancake Palace "by Nan Marino, eleven-year-old musical prodigy, Elvis Ruby, was supposed to win the most coveted reality show on television, "Tween Star." None of the other contestants even came close to his talents. But in the middle of the biggest night, with millions of people watching, Elvis panicked. He forgot the words to the song. He forgot the tune. He forgot how to play every single instrument he'd ever known and froze on national TV. So Elvis must run from the paparazzi camped outside his door and spend the summer working with his aunt and cousin at Piney Pete's Pancake Palace in the remote wilds of New Jersey. It's the perfect place to be anonymous, that is until Elvis meets Cecilia, a girl who can't seem to help blurting out whatever's on her mind. An NPR Best Book of 2013

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781596437531
  • ISBN-10: 1596437537
  • Publisher: Roaring Brook Press
  • Publish Date: April 2013
  • Page Count: 250
  • Reading Level: Ages 8-12


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Performing Arts - Music
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Social Issues - Emotions & Feelings
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Social Issues - Friendship

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2013-02-25
  • Reviewer: Staff

After completely choking during the live televised finals of an American Idol–type show, 11-year-old musical prodigy Elvis Ruby (who was heavily favored to win) hides from the paparazzi at his Aunt Emily’s humble pancake restaurant in New Jersey’s Pinelands. Though he cuts and dyes his trademark black curly hair and introduces himself to the townsfolk as Aaron, his identity is quickly uncovered by Cecilia, a friendless seventh-grader undergoing a musical crisis of her own. Marino’s (Neil Armstrong Is My Uncle and Other Lies Muscle Man McGinty Told Me) affection for New Jersey’s coastal preserve shines through in her descriptions of its natural beauty, not to mention the way the pancake house showcases its natural resources with its red (cranberry), white (plain), and blueberry stacks. But a subplot about the legendary Jersey Devil, also famed to be hiding in the Pine Barrens, doesn’t add enough to warrant its inclusion, and until the paparazzi finally arrive, not a lot happens. That said, the warmth and humor of the story will help carry readers through to its satisfying conclusion. Ages 8–12. Agent: Rosemary Stimola, Stimola Literary Studio. (Apr.)

 
BookPage Reviews

A place to hide becomes a place to grow

Ever wonder what it’s like to be on a reality competition like “American Idol”? What if it were a show for child performers? What would their lives look like? Author Nan Marino brings us the story of Elvis Ruby, an 11-year-old boy who, after becoming the most popular contestant on “Tween Star,” freezes on stage during his final performance. To escape the paparazzi and have some quiet time to heal, Elvis’ father takes him to the remote town of Wares Grove, in New Jersey’s Pine Barrens, where he can “hide out” with his aunt and cousin, who own a local restaurant. Marino deftly draws a character who loves music and performing but needs something more in his life.

Cecilia Wreel lives in Wares Grove and is content, mostly, with her life and where she is—except that she wants to hear a particular song that no one can find. When she figures out early on who Elvis really is, she is not especially impressed with his fame, but she recognizes that he might be able to help her find the music. Elvis must learn to trust her, and others, while he figures out what kind of person he wants to be.

Marino has written a simple but beautiful story about love and honesty, music and acceptance. She includes the legend of the Pine Barrens’ “Jersey Devil” between chapters, using it to illustrate how the negative opinions of others should not define who you are. Her prose is accessible and genuine and moves the plot along at a perfect pace. Whether they have visions of being a star, like Elvis, or think they have no talent, like Cecilia, young readers will be drawn to this sympathetic account of the struggles of being a tween.

 
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