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Lucky Break
by Esther Freud

Overview - It is their first day at Drama Arts, and the nervous students huddled in a circle are told in no uncertain terms that here, unlike at any other drama school, they will be taught to Act. To Be. To exist in their own world on the stage. But outside is the real world--a pitiless, alluring place in which each of them in their most fervent dreams hopes to flourish and excel.  Read more...

 
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More About Lucky Break by Esther Freud
 
 
 
Overview
It is their first day at Drama Arts, and the nervous students huddled in a circle are told in no uncertain terms that here, unlike at any other drama school, they will be taught to Act. To Be. To exist in their own world on the stage. But outside is the real world--a pitiless, alluring place in which each of them in their most fervent dreams hopes to flourish and excel. 320 pp. 20,000 print.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781608196906
  • ISBN-10: 1608196909
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
  • Publish Date: October 2011
  • Page Count: 310


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Literary

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-07-04
  • Reviewer: Staff

Freud (Hideous Kinky) chronicles 14 years in the life of a group of young actors who meet at the world-renowned acting school, Drama Arts, in London. Nell is insecure, plain, and passive, allowing her beautiful friend Charlie to walk all over her. Dan and Jemma, both ambitious and passionate, fall quickly in love as schoolmates. But a lot can happen in a decade, especially to people in their tumultuous 20s; careers diverge, creating, in the case of Dan and Jemma, an insidious gulf in their marriage. Charlie, meanwhile, finds that maintaining her looks is not just difficult (and costly), but exacts a different kind of price.And while after years of obscure toil, an unlikely film role finally brings the spotlight upon Nell (she even shares the red carpet with Prince Charles and Camilla). These four hopefuls succeed, fail, rise, and fall, tumbling together in Freud's easygoing narrative. The fragile egos, intense competition, and uncaring industry have an impact on all involved, no matter what level of success they enjoy, but no one ever seems ready to abandon this world, even if it's abandoned them. Drawing inspiration from her early acting training, Freud finds joy and heartbreak in her winning ensemble. (Nov.)

 
BookPage Reviews

The dramatic life of the theatre

In her seventh novel, Lucky Break, Esther Freud draws on her own experience as a drama student and actress (and the wife of actor David Morrissey) to explore what it takes to pursue a life dedicated to acting. Her cast is a group of young men and women who meet on the first day at a prestigious (and pretentious) drama academy and stay connected over the next decade, even as their professional paths diverge.

Rather than focus on a single character, Freud throws her net wide, the better to explore the varied experiences of these potential thespians. The circle of friends includes plump and plain Nell, who worries that her looks will garner her nothing but small parts as the maid or best friend and grabs at the opportunity to play a penguin in a traveling children’s show. Charlie, whose exotic beauty easily wins her leading roles, finds her interest waning as she discovers new skills that have nothing to with her appearance. Perhaps the most ambitious of them all, Dan, chosen to play Hamlet while still in school, realizes success upon success, but all his accomplishments seem fragile, balanced against a future filled with unknowns. His wife Jemma never pursues her own dreams, finding that Dan’s victories demand sacrifices by the whole family.

Freud creates an atmosphere that is filled with the rich particulars of an actor’s life. Tense auditions, grasping agents, red carpet premieres and predatory directors dot the landscape of seedy pubs, dismal hotels and out-of-the-way location shoots. Freud is able to cast an equally sympathetic eye over all her characters, following their ups and downs with empathy and accuracy. When Nell wavers between two agents, the loyal worker toiling in the crowded office versus the glamorous professional behind the rosewood desk, we never sense Freud’s judgment despite the faint hint of satire.

Best of all, Freud captures the ebb and flow of luck, good and bad, and the literally life-changing effect it has on careers. Bad luck can be as simple and devastating as an outbreak of acne on the day of a shoot, and good luck as fortunate as simply picking up the right phone at the right time. That both occur is one of the many delights of this engaging novel.

 
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