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Jerusalem : Chronicles from the Holy City
by Guy Delisle and Lucie Firoud and Helge Dascher

Overview -

"Neither Jewish nor Arab, Delisle explores Jerusalem and is able to observe this strange world with candidness and humor...But most of all, those stories convey what life in East Jerusalem is about for an expatriate."--Haaretz

"Engaging... Delisle] highlights the very complex lives of Israelis, Palestinians, and foreign residents."--Publishers Weekly Starred Review

Guy Delisle expertly lays the groundwork for a cultural road map of contemporary Jerusalem, utilizing the classic stranger in a strange land point of view that made his other books, "Pyongyang, Shenzhen, "and "Burma Chronicles" required reading for understanding what daily life is like in cities few are able to travel to.  Read more...


 
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    Jerusalem (Paperback)
    Published: 2015-03-01
    Publisher: Drawn & Quarterly
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More About Jerusalem by Guy Delisle; Lucie Firoud; Helge Dascher
 
 
 
Overview

"Neither Jewish nor Arab, Delisle explores Jerusalem and is able to observe this strange world with candidness and humor...But most of all, those stories convey what life in East Jerusalem is about for an expatriate."--Haaretz

"Engaging... Delisle] highlights the very complex lives of Israelis, Palestinians, and foreign residents."--Publishers Weekly Starred Review

Guy Delisle expertly lays the groundwork for a cultural road map of contemporary Jerusalem, utilizing the classic stranger in a strange land point of view that made his other books, "Pyongyang, Shenzhen, "and "Burma Chronicles" required reading for understanding what daily life is like in cities few are able to travel to. In "Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City," Delisle explores the complexities of a city that represents so much to so many. He eloquently examines the impact of the conflict on the lives of people on both sides of the wall while drolly recounting the quotidian: checkpoints, traffic jams, and holidays. When observing the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim populations that call Jerusalem home, Delisle's drawn line is both sensitive and fair, assuming nothing and drawing everything. "Jerusalem" showcases once more Delisle's mastery of the travelogue.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781770460713
  • ISBN-10: 1770460713
  • Publisher: Drawn & Quarterly
  • Publish Date: April 2012
  • Page Count: 336


Related Categories

Books > Comics & Graphic Novels > Literary

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-02-20
  • Reviewer: Staff

Delisle returns to his autobiographical travel format (Burma Chronicles; Pyongyang) with this engaging and troubling look at life in Jerusalem in 2008 and 2009 that won a gold medal for Best Graphic Albumat Angoulême. With his wife, who works for Doctors Without Borders (Medecins sans Frontières, MSF), and their two young children, Delisle sees Jerusalem and the Israeli/Palestinian conflict with the eyes of an outsider. His experiences are recorded in vignettes that touch on such topics as the wall that separates Palestinian and Israeli territories, the problems of airport security, and the very different tours visitors receive depending on the perspective of their guides. Like MSF, Delisle’s perspective tends heavily in favor of the Palestinians, particularly those killed in the bombings of Gaza during Operation Cast Lead, which took place during his year there. Delisle is not religious, and his lack of identification with any of the religions of Israel allows him to comment freely on all of them. With a more simplistic style than in Pyongyang, Delisle’s use of less shading and starker line work highlights the very complex lives of Israelis, Palestinians, and foreign residents. Dascher’s translation is fluid, and the colors by Delisle and Lucie Firoud are effective at setting off distinct scenes. (Apr.)

 
BookPage Reviews

Books for the budding traveler

Robert Reid is the U.S. Travel Editor for Lonely Planet. In a column written exclusively for BookPage, he highlights terrific travel books, both old and new. This month, he selects some of the best books on the classic road trip.


The best thing a family can do when planning a trip is to include the kids right from the start. Make the whole process of picking a destination, finding places to stay, booking flights or plotting highway routes a family activity. At 10, I got to plan a short ski trip—our first—and I chose an empty summer lodge with staff that wasn’t sure why we were there. Still, it ended up being one of the most memorable trips we ever had.

I’ve always believed that the travel bug begins by just looking at maps. For a creative approach to map-making, check out Katharine Harmon’s imaginative The Map as Art: Contemporary Artists Explore Cartography. Another great way to get the whole family involved is to pin up a map, like Michelin’s laminated USA wall map, on a family room wall and let everyone tape notes where they want to go most, then rate best/funniest/worst moment on the map after a trip.

For young readers, there are plenty of books to help inspire curiosity in the world and keep them entertained on the road. Lonely Planet’s new Not For Parents series is perfect for the budding traveler, with cartoon-based overviews of the featured cities (New York, London, Paris and Rome), along with quirky facts about familiar places (how the Roman Colosseum was first used, why you should never say “piece of pizza” in New York). For a bigger picture, the addictively browsable Not for Parents Travel Book covers the whole world. If the kids think your guidebooks are boring, try these and see if their tune changes.

Little ones might also enjoy the classic globe-trotting adventures of Tintin, particularly now that it’s been made into a popular movie. Older comic fans should consider Québécois comic-book artist Guy Delisle, who has published a series of superb travel-based books, including his latest, Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City.

A fun book to help inspire teens (and adults) is Keri Smith’s playful How to Be an Explorer of the World, filled with hand-drawn tips and ideas on how to collect things in your daily life and on the road, and create a “life museum” with your finds. It shares some of the great universal truths about travel: No place is boring, and there’s more than one way to explore.

Robert Reid is Lonely Planet’s U.S. Travel Editor and always has at least one big map pinned to the wall.

 
BAM Customer Reviews

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