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American Revolutions : A Continental History, 1750-1804
by Alan Taylor


Overview -

The American Revolution is often portrayed as a high-minded, orderly event whose capstone, the Constitution, provided the ideal framework for a democratic, prosperous nation. Alan Taylor, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, gives us a different creation story in this magisterial history of the nation s founding.  Read more...


 
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More About American Revolutions by Alan Taylor
 
 
 
Overview

The American Revolution is often portrayed as a high-minded, orderly event whose capstone, the Constitution, provided the ideal framework for a democratic, prosperous nation. Alan Taylor, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, gives us a different creation story in this magisterial history of the nation s founding.

Rising out of the continental rivalries of European empires and their native allies, Taylor s Revolution builds like a ground fire overspreading Britain s mainland colonies, fueled by local conditions, destructive, hard to quell. Conflict ignited on the frontier, where settlers clamored to push west into Indian lands against British restrictions, and in the seaboard cities, where commercial elites mobilized riots and boycotts to resist British tax policies. When war erupted, Patriot crowds harassed Loyalists and nonpartisans into compliance with their cause. Brutal guerrilla violence flared all along the frontier from New York to the Carolinas, fed by internal divisions as well as the clash with Britain. Taylor skillfully draws France, Spain, and native powers into a comprehensive narrative of the war that delivers the major battles, generals, and common soldiers with insight and power.

With discord smoldering in the fragile new nation through the 1780s, nationalist leaders such as James Madison and Alexander Hamilton sought to restrain unruly state democracies and consolidate power in a Federal Constitution. Assuming the mantle of We the People, the advocates of national power ratified the new frame of government. But their opponents prevailed in the presidency of Thomas Jefferson, whose vision of a western empire of liberty aligned with the long-standing, expansive ambitions of frontier settlers. White settlement and black slavery spread west, setting the stage for a civil war that nearly destroyed the union created by the founders.

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Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780393082814
  • ISBN-10: 0393082814
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • Publish Date: September 2016
  • Page Count: 704


Related Categories

Books > History > United States - Colonial Period
Books > History > United States - Revolutionary War
Books > History > Military - United States

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2016-06-13
  • Reviewer: Staff

Taylor, professor of history at the University of Virginia and Pulitzer Prize–winner for The Internal Enemy, further cements his reputation with this comprehensive analysis of an American Revolution that was anything but the relatively decorous event of popular myth. The revolutionary era was a time of divisions and uncertainties. “Turmoil persisted after the formal peace treaty,” Taylor writes. But that upheaval inspired political and cultural creativity that enabled a nation to emerge from “much cruelty, violence, and destruction.” Stressing the importance of the trans-Appalachian west, Taylor suggests that the conflict between land-hungry settlers and restrictive British polices was just as important to sparking revolution as the resistance to taxation that inflamed the Atlantic coast. This expanded perspective frames Taylor’s presentation of George Washington’s understanding that “victory hinged on who could endure a long, hard, bitter struggle.” Taylor analyzes “the cycles of invasion, exposure, and suppression” that convinced most Americans that “a Patriot victory offered the best prospect for restoring peace and stability.” He also highlights the “broad and anarchic borderland” where “Patriots fought... to suppress the independence of native peoples” in the name of creating an “empire of liberty.” Provocative and persuasive, Taylor’s fine work demonstrates that on a continent “riven with competing allegiances and multiple possibilities,” the newly independent U.S. by no means faced a secure future. (Sept.)

 
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