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Ameritopia : The Unmaking of America
by Mark R. Levin and Adam Grupper and Mark R. Levin

Overview -

#1 New York Times bestselling author Mark Levin explores the philosophical basis of America's foundations and the crisis that faces government today.

Mark R. Levin's Liberty and Tyranny made the most persuasive case for conservatism and against statism in a generation.  Read more...



 

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More About Ameritopia by Mark R. Levin; Adam Grupper; Mark R. Levin
 
 
 
Overview

#1 New York Times bestselling author Mark Levin explores the philosophical basis of America's foundations and the crisis that faces government today.

Mark R. Levin's Liberty and Tyranny made the most persuasive case for conservatism and against statism in a generation. In this most crucial time, this leading conservative thinker explores the psychology, motivations, and history of the utopian movement, its architects, and its modern day disciples--and how the individual and American society are being devoured by it.

In Ameritopia: The Unmaking of America Levin asks, what is this utopian force that both allures a free people and destroys them? In the end, Levin's message is clear: The American republic is in great peril. The people must now choose between utopianism or liberty.

 
Details
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
  • Date: Jan 2012
 
Excerpts

From the book


EPILOGUE

MY PREMISE, IN THE first sentence of the first chapter of this book, is this: "Tyranny, broadly defined, is the use of power to dehumanize the individual and delegitimize his nature. Political utopianism is tyranny disguised as a desirable, workable, and even paradisiacal governing ideology."

Plato's Republic, More's Utopia, Hobbes's Leviathan, and Marx's workers' paradise are utopias that are anti-individual and anti-individualism. For the utopians, modern and olden, the individual is one-dimensional--selfish. On his own, he has little moral value. Contrarily, authoritarianism is defended as altruistic and masterminds as socially conscious. Thus endless interventions in the individual's life and manipulation of his conditions are justified as not only necessary and desirable but noble governmental pursuits. This false dialectic is at the heart of the problem we face today.

In truth, man is naturally independent and self-reliant, which are attributes that contribute to his own well-being and survival, and the well-being and survival of a civil society. He is also a social being who is charitable and compassionate. History abounds with examples, as do the daily lives of individuals. To condemn individualism as the utopians do is to condemn the very foundation of the civil society and the American founding and endorse, wittingly or unwittingly, oppression. Karl Popper saw it as an attack on Western civilization. "The emancipation of the individual was indeed the great spiritual revolution which had led to the breakdown of tribalism and to the rise of democracy."1 Moreover, Judaism and Christianity, among other religions, teach the altruism of the individual.

Of course, this is not to defend anarchy. Quite the opposite. It is to endorse the magnificence of the American founding. The American founding was an exceptional exercise in collective human virtue and wisdom--a culmination of thousands of years of experience, knowledge, reason, and faith. The Declaration of Independence is a remarkable societal proclamation of human rights, brilliant in its insight, clarity, and conciseness. The Constitution of the United States is an extraordinary matrix of governmental limits, checks, balances, and divisions, intended to secure for posterity the individual's sovereignty as proclaimed in the Declaration.

This is the grand heritage to which every American citizen is born. It has been characterized as "the American Dream," "the American experiment," and "American exceptionalism." The country has been called "the Land of Opportunity," "the Land of Milk and Honey," and "a Shining City on a Hill." It seems unimaginable that a people so endowed by Providence, and the beneficiaries of such unparalleled human excellence, would choose or tolerate a course that ensures their own decline and enslavement, for a government unleashed on the civil society is a government that destroys the nature of man.

On September 17, 1787, at the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Delegate James Wilson, on behalf of his ailing colleague from Pennsylvania, Benjamin Franklin, read aloud Franklin's speech to the convention in favor of adopting the Constitution. Among other things, Franklin said that the Constitution "is likely to be well administered for a Course of Years, and can only end in Despotism as other Forms have done before it, when the People shall become corrupt as to need Despotic Government, being incapable of any other...."2

Have we "become corrupt"? Are we in need of "despotic government"? It appears that some modern-day "leading lights" think so, as they...

 
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