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Articles on History of the Federal Reserve, Including : Aldricha Vreeland ACT, Jekyll Island, Paul Warburg, 1951 Accord, Too Big to Fail, History of Fe
by Hephaestus Books and Hephaestus Books


Overview - Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Hephaestus Books represents a new publishing paradigm, allowing disparate content sources to be curated into cohesive, relevant, and informative books.  Read more...

 
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More About Articles on History of the Federal Reserve, Including by Hephaestus Books; Hephaestus Books
 
 
 
Overview
Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Hephaestus Books represents a new publishing paradigm, allowing disparate content sources to be curated into cohesive, relevant, and informative books. To date, this content has been curated from Wikipedia articles and images under Creative Commons licensing, although as Hephaestus Books continues to increase in scope and dimension, more licensed and public domain content is being added. We believe books such as this represent a new and exciting lexicon in the sharing of human knowledge. This particular book is a collaboration focused on History of the Federal Reserve.More info: This article is about the history of the United States Federal Reserve System from its creation to the present. The Federal Reserve System is the third central banking system in the United States' history. The First Bank of the United States (1791-1811) and the Second Bank of the United States (1816-1836) each had 20-year charters, and both issued currency, made commercial loans, accepted deposits, purchased securities, had multiple branches, and acted as fiscal agents for the U.S. Treasury. In both banks the Federal Government was required to purchase 20% of the bank's capital stock and appoint 20% of the directors. Thus majority control was in the hands of private investors who purchased the rest of the stock. The banks were opposed by state-chartered banks, who saw them as very large competitors, and by many who understood them to be banking cartels which compelled to them servitude of the common man. President Andrew Jackson vetoed legislation to renew the Second Bank of the United States, starting a period of free banking. Jackson staked his second term on the issue of central banking stating, "Every monopoly and all exclusive privileges are granted at the expense of the public, which ought to receive a fair equivalent. The many millions which this act proposes to bestow on the stockholders of the existing bank must come directly or indirectly out of the earnings of the American people."


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  • ISBN-13: 9781242574146
  • ISBN-10: 124257414X
  • Publisher: Hephaestus Books
  • Publish Date: August 2011
  • Page Count: 36


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