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Awesome Possum Family Band
by Jimmy Osmond and Bob Ostrom


Overview - There's No Business Like Show Business
And for the Awesome Possum Family Band, they're about to get their big break The youngest possum wants to join in the music making but doesn't know his talent...
To be a part of the family showbiz, Possum Number Nine tries to discover his special gift.
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More About Awesome Possum Family Band by Jimmy Osmond; Bob Ostrom
 
 
 
Overview
There's No Business Like Show Business
And for the Awesome Possum Family Band, they're about to get their big break The youngest possum wants to join in the music making but doesn't know his talent...
To be a part of the family showbiz, Possum Number Nine tries to discover his special gift. Is it painting, presenting, or playing the drums?
Find out in Jimmy Osmond's inspiring "tail" about the importance of family and following your dreams.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781621572114
  • ISBN-10: 1621572110
  • Publisher: Regnery Kids
  • Publish Date: June 2014
  • Page Count: 40
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8
  • Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.7 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Animals - General
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Performing Arts - Music

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-03-17
  • Reviewer: Staff

The youngest member of the musical Osmonds offers a fictional take on his childhood quest to find his niche in the family business. Osmond portrays the clan as anthropomorphic possums with numbers instead of names; the youngest sibling, Number Nine, botches repeated efforts to discover his talent. When he tries to make a poster promoting the band, he flings paint everywhere, splattering himself, two brothers, and the dog. After playing instruments and attempting other jobs prove similarly disastrous, his mother offers some platitudinous advice: “It takes some time to figure out, just what we love to do./ So practice, practice, practice, to make your dreams come true.” Despite this emphasis on hard work, none is needed: after Number Nine starts singing to himself, his older siblings immediately take him on as singer. Osmond’s high-energy cartoons are cheerful and competently drafted, but his verse suffers from wobbly rhythms and often strains after its rhymes (“Next he grabbed a hammer, building stage sets with his dad./ Maybe this was where he’d find a talent that he had”). An overlong quest for self-discovery with a too-easy resolution. Ages 4–8. (May)

 
BAM Customer Reviews