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Babies Don't Eat Pizza : A Big Kids' Book about Baby Brothers and Baby Sisters
by Dianne Danzig and Debbie Tilley


Overview - With kid-friendly honesty and humor, Babies Don t Eat Pizza informs and reassures children experiencing babies joining their families. Debbie Tilley s fun, whimsical illustrations highlight the book s lighthearted, yet sensitive, tone.  Read more...

 
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More About Babies Don't Eat Pizza by Dianne Danzig; Debbie Tilley
 
 
 
Overview
With kid-friendly honesty and humor, Babies Don t Eat Pizza informs and reassures children experiencing babies joining their families. Debbie Tilley s fun, whimsical illustrations highlight the book s lighthearted, yet sensitive, tone. To encourage family discussions, Babies Don t Eat Pizzais best read over time."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780525474418
  • ISBN-10: 0525474412
  • Publisher: Dutton Books
  • Publish Date: January 2009
  • Page Count: 32
  • Reading Level: Ages 3-5


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Family - New Baby

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 49.
  • Review Date: 2008-11-10
  • Reviewer: Staff

While Danzig, an R.N. who has led sibling preparation classes for two decades, and Tilley (Growing Up: It’s a Girl Thing) seek a spot on a very crowded bookshelf, their practical, straightforward approach merits a look. Focusing on day-to-day living with an infant, the text adopts an unfussy tone that subtly flatters readers as being sensible and mature (relatively speaking). “Babies are small and fragile and strong,” writes Danzig. “Watch out for your ears and nose, and don’t let your hair get too close.” It’s also notable that Danzig refers to the infant as “your baby,” clearly signaling that the reader has a stake in all this, too. She reinforces the connection by referring readers frequently to their own babyhood: “Can you believe you had to learn to roll over?” Tilley’s ink and watercolor cartoons are sunny and empathic in the Laura Cornell mode, and include plenty of visual jokes to encourage anxious kids—and their parents—to bond. Headings on most spreads make this volume eminently browsable—and therefore a handy family resource. Ages 3–5. (Jan.)

 
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