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Brief Thief
by Michael Escoffier and Kris Di Giacomo


Overview -

Witty, humorous illustrations of great charm tell this story of conscience and mistaken identity as thoroughly as the book's delightful text. Here a lizard takes the liberty of using what seem to be some old underpants when he runs out of toilet paper.  Read more...


 
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More About Brief Thief by Michael Escoffier; Kris Di Giacomo
 
 
 
Overview

Witty, humorous illustrations of great charm tell this story of conscience and mistaken identity as thoroughly as the book's delightful text. Here a lizard takes the liberty of using what seem to be some old underpants when he runs out of toilet paper. What he doesn't count on is that his own conscience and an outraged rabbit will be watching.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781592701315
  • ISBN-10: 1592701310
  • Publisher: Enchanted Lion Books
  • Publish Date: April 2013
  • Page Count: 32
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8
  • Dimensions: 12 x 9.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.15 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Animals - Reptiles & Amphibians
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Health & Daily Living - General
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Humorous Stories

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2013-03-04
  • Reviewer: Staff

Be forewarned—this story from the team behind Rabbit and the Not-So-Big-Bad-Wolf centers on the act of wiping after a poo. Yet it teaches a worthy lesson with sparkling dialogue and an excellent punch line. Goggle-eyed chameleon Leon, out in the forest doing his business, finds himself without any paper and instead uses a pair of underpants that are hanging on a tree. They appear to be abandoned, and “anyway, they’re full of holes.” Di Giacomo suggests the forest’s leaves and trees with splashed green paint, but her main interest is Leon’s beautifully abashed expressions. When a disembodied voice addresses Leon—“It’s me, your conscience”—his anguished grin gives the lie to his excuses. The voice bullies Leon into restoring things to their original state: “Go on, scrub! Like you mean it!” It turns out that there’s someone else in the forest who has a very specific use for those underpants. Escoffier has unusual insight into the psychology of doing something bad and getting caught. Readers will wince along with Leon, and laugh out loud when they find out what the underpants are really for. Ages 4–8. (Apr.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews