Coupon
Burning Down the House : The End of Juvenile Prison
by Nell Bernstein


Overview - When teenagers scuffle during a basketball game, they are typically benched. But when Will got into it on the court, he and his rival were sprayed in the face at close range by a chemical similar to Mace, denied a shower for twenty-four hours, and then locked in solitary confinement for a month.  Read more...

 
Hardcover
  • $26.95

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

If you order this item now, it will not delay the rest of your order.

FREE Shipping for Club Members
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 16 copies from $7.66
 
 
 
 

More About Burning Down the House by Nell Bernstein
 
 
 
Overview
When teenagers scuffle during a basketball game, they are typically benched. But when Will got into it on the court, he and his rival were sprayed in the face at close range by a chemical similar to Mace, denied a shower for twenty-four hours, and then locked in solitary confinement for a month.

One in three American children will be arrested by the time they are twenty-three, and many will spend time locked inside horrific detention centers that defy everything we know about how to rehabilitate young offenders. In a clear-eyed indictment of the juvenile justice system run amok, award-winning journalist Nell Bernstein shows that there is no right way to lock up a child. The very act of isolation denies delinquent children the thing that is most essential to their growth and rehabilitation: positive relationships with caring adults.

Bernstein introduces us to youth across the nation who have suffered violence and psychological torture at the hands of the state. She presents these youths all as fully realized people, not victims. As they describe in their own voices their fight to maintain their humanity and protect their individuality in environments that would deny both, these young people offer a hopeful alternative to the doomed effort to reform a system that should only be dismantled.

Burning Down the House is a clarion call to shut down our nation's brutal and counterproductive juvenile prisons and bring our children home.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781595589569
  • ISBN-10: 1595589562
  • Publisher: New Press
  • Publish Date: June 2014
  • Page Count: 365
  • Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.1 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.45 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Social Science > Penology
Books > Law > Criminal Law - Juvenile Offenders
Books > Law > Civil Rights

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-04-07
  • Reviewer: Staff

Award-winning journalist Bernstein (All Alone in the World) turns her attention to the U.S. juvenile justice system in which more than 66,000 youths are confined. Many young people in large detention centers live under “constant surveillance,” fearful of beatings, rape, solitary confinement, or being denied showers, companionship, and adequate food. Such is the grim reality of a system that removes two elements central to adolescent development—connection and autonomy—and, as Bernstein documents, drives low-level delinquents deeper into criminality. With considerable empathy, Bernstein introduces adolescents in and out of detention centers, capturing their struggles to overcome traumatic histories. She covers the rise of the “super-predator myth” in the late 1980s/early 1990s that led to increased rates of juvenile incarceration and more stringent laws (“three strikes”), as well as the wave of reform that resulted in a 39% drop in incarceration in the past decade. She interviews reform-minded administrators like Tom Decker, director of Missouri’s juvenile justice system, a model for other states because of its acclaimed network of small, non-institutional placements and low rates of recidivism. Visiting “therapeutic” prisons in Minnesota, California, and New York, she concludes that no matter how much effort goes into creating “a kinder, gentler prison,” these institutions remain embedded in a larger culture that seems impervious to reform. Passionate, thoughtful, and well-researched, this is a resounding call to action. Agent: Kathleen Anderson, Anderson Literary Management. (June)

 
BAM Customer Reviews