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Carbon Shock : A Tale of Risk and Calculus on the Front Lines of the Disrupted Global Economy
by Mark Schapiro


Overview -

In Carbon Shock , veteran journalist Mark Schapiro takes readers on a journey into a world where the same chaotic forces reshaping our natural world are also transforming the economy, playing havoc with corporate calculations, shifting economic and political power, and upending our understanding of the real risks, costs, and possibilities of what lies ahead.  Read more...


 
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More About Carbon Shock by Mark Schapiro
 
 
 
Overview

In Carbon Shock, veteran journalist Mark Schapiro takes readers on a journey into a world where the same chaotic forces reshaping our natural world are also transforming the economy, playing havoc with corporate calculations, shifting economic and political power, and upending our understanding of the real risks, costs, and possibilities of what lies ahead.

In this ever-changing world, carbon--the stand-in for all greenhouse gases--rules, and disrupts, and calls upon us to seek new ways to reduce it while factoring it into nearly every long-term financial plan we have. But how?

From the jungles of the Amazon to the farms in California's Central Valley, from 'greening' cities like Pittsburgh to rising powerhouses like China, from the oil-splattered beaches of Spain to carbon-trading desks in London, Schapiro deftly explores the key axis points of change.

For almost two decades, global climate talks have focused on how to make polluters pay for the carbon they emit. It remains an unfolding financial mystery: What are the costs? Who will pay for them? Who do you pay? How do you pay? And what are the potential impacts? The answers to these questions, and more, are crucial to understanding, if not shaping, the coming decade.

Carbon Shock evokes a world in which the parameters of our understanding are shifting--on a scale even more monumental than how the digital revolution transformed financial decision-making--toward a slow but steady acknowledgement of the costs and consequences of climate change. It also offers a critical new perspective as global leaders gear up for the next round of climate talks in 2015.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781603585576
  • ISBN-10: 1603585575
  • Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing Company
  • Publish Date: August 2014
  • Page Count: 216
  • Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.23 x 0.87 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.08 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Business & Economics > Environmental Economics
Books > Business & Economics > International - Economics
Books > Political Science > Public Policy - Economic Policy

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-10-13
  • Reviewer: Staff

In this thought-provoking work, journalist Shapiro (Exposed: The Toxic Chemistry of Everyday Products) tackles the question: "What are the costs of climate change?" In search of an answer, he embarks on a multi-year investigation that sends him across the globe. To humanize the issue, Shapiro traces the carbon footprint he leaves through such trips as a flight to Siberia, visits to the biggest commercial nursery west of the Mississippi and to Manchester (England's former textiles center), and a tour of Guangzhou, "one of the top ten carbon-emitting provinces in a country that is itself the leading emitter." One of the most affecting chapters recounts how an oil spill from the tanker Prestige along the coast of Galicia in 2002 devastated a nearby town's economy and cost billions in cleanup expenses. Along the way, Shapiro assesses the response from multinational corporations and governments, asserting that they don't sufficiently quantify these costs–or worse, hide them, with the help of compromised auditors. While not a deeply scientific or academic examination, Shapiro‘s tough look at how our current habits of consumption will cost us down the road, combined with his hard-hitting, journalistic style, makes for a dramatic read. (Aug.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews