Coupon
Counting Descent
by Clint Smith


Overview - Clint Smith's debut poetry collection, Counting Descent, is a coming of age story that seeks to complicate our conception of lineage and tradition. Smith explores the cognitive dissonance that results from belonging to a community that unapologetically celebrates black humanity while living in a world that often renders blackness a caricature of fear.  Read more...

 
Paperback
  • $15.00

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock Online.

FREE Shipping for Club Members
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 24 copies from $9.74
 
 
 

More About Counting Descent by Clint Smith
 
 
 
Overview
Clint Smith's debut poetry collection, Counting Descent, is a coming of age story that seeks to complicate our conception of lineage and tradition. Smith explores the cognitive dissonance that results from belonging to a community that unapologetically celebrates black humanity while living in a world that often renders blackness a caricature of fear. His poems move fluidly across personal and political histories, all the while reflecting on the social construction of our lived experiences. Smith brings the reader on a powerful journey forcing us to reflect on all that we learn growing up, and all that we seek to unlearn moving forward. Winner, 2017 Black Caucus of the American Library Association Literary Award Finalist, 2017 NAACP Image Awards 2017 'One Book One New Orleans' Book Selection

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781938912658
  • ISBN-10: 1938912659
  • Publisher: Write Bloody Publishing
  • Publish Date: September 2016
  • Page Count: 84
  • Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.8 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.3 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Poetry > American - African American

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2017-01-02
  • Reviewer: Staff

Writer and educator Smith gives voice to the voiceless in his debut collection, a lyrical coming-of-age narrative that confronts insidious and absurd perceptions of young black men, and the absurdities of the racism from which they arise. He deftly utilizes personification, as in the devastating poem What the Fire Hydrant Said To the Black Boy: they say we both come with warnings/ for others not to stand too close, Smith writes, but when they open us/ everyone stands around to watch:// spilling until theres nothing left inside. He also addresses the struggle over means of activism and protest, putting James Baldwin in conversation with the protest novel, and giving art the chance to respond. Some of the collections imagery is overly familiar, as when he describes a young man as having an indomitable sort of swag or writes of boys who were dawdling/ amalgamations of awkward and bravado. Still, the collection does not want for emotional resonance. Smiths poems are prescient and necessary, reminding readers of whats truly at stake when power treats a young person like he wasnt somebodys child. (Sept.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews