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Courage Has No Color : The True Story of the Triple Nickles: America's First Black Paratroopers
by Tanya Lee Stone


Overview - A 2014 YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction Finalist
They became America s first black paratroopers. Why was their story never told? Sibert Medalist Tanya Lee Stone reveals the history of the Triple Nickles during World War II.
World War II is raging, and thousands of American soldiers are fighting overseas against the injustices brought on by Hitler.
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More About Courage Has No Color by Tanya Lee Stone
 
 
 
Overview
A 2014 YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction Finalist
They became America s first black paratroopers. Why was their story never told? Sibert Medalist Tanya Lee Stone reveals the history of the Triple Nickles during World War II.
World War II is raging, and thousands of American soldiers are fighting overseas against the injustices brought on by Hitler. Back on the home front, the injustice of discrimination against African Americans plays out as much on Main Street as in the military. Enlisted black men are segregated from white soldiers and regularly relegated to service duties. At Fort Benning, Georgia, First Sergeant Walter Morris s men serve as guards at The Parachute School, while the white soldiers prepare to be paratroopers. Morris knows that for his men to be treated like soldiers, they have to train and act like them, but would the military elite and politicians recognize the potential of these men as well as their passion for serving their country? Tanya Lee Stone examines the role of African Americans in the military through the history of the Triple Nickles, America s first black paratroopers, who fought in a little-known attack on the American West by the Japanese. The 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion, in the words of Morris, "proved that the color of a man had nothing to do with his ability."
From "Courage Has No Color"
What did it take to be a paratrooper in World War II? Specialized training, extreme physical fitness, courage, and until the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion (the Triple Nickles) was formed white skin.
It is 1943. Americans are overseas fighting World War II to help keep the world safe from Adolf Hitler s tyranny, safe from injustice, safe from discrimination. Yet right here at home, people with white skin have rights that people with black skin do not.
What is courage? What is strength? Perhaps it is being ready to fight for your nation even when your nation isn t ready to fight for you."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780763651176
  • ISBN-10: 0763651176
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press (MA)
  • Publish Date: January 2013
  • Page Count: 147
  • Reading Level: Ages 10-13
  • Dimensions: 10.1 x 9.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds

Series: Junior Library Guild Selection

Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > History - Military & Wars
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > People & Places - United States - African-American
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Social Topics - Prejudice & Racism

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-11-12
  • Reviewer: Staff

Stone (Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream) opens with an enticing question, “What is it like to jump out of an airplane?” The answer, which lets readers imagine doing just that as a paratrooper, will immediately draw them into this thorough story of the U.S. military’s first black paratroopers. More than just an account of their endeavors during WWII, the narrative takes on a broader perspective as it contextualizes the story of the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion. Set against the entrenched racism of the 1940s, the nine chapters include asides about media stereotypes regarding African-Americans and how photographs of black soldiers were often left out of the military record. Myriad quotations from personal interviews and more than 100 b&w photos reveal the heroism and perseverance of these groundbreaking men. While they didn’t see combat (they were instead sent out West to become smoke jumpers), Stone’s final chapters reveal how the Triple Nickles’ service helped integrate both the military and society at large. A captivating look at a small but significant piece of military and civil rights history. Ages 10–up. Agent: Rosemary Stimola, Stimola Literary Studio. (Jan.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews