(2)
 
Deep Ancestry Inside the Genographic Project
by Spencer Wells

Overview - Science tells us we're all related--one vast family sharing a common ancestor who lived in Africa 60,000 years ago. But countless questions remain about our great journey from the birthplace of "Homo sapiens" to the ends of the Earth. How did we end up where we are?  Read more...

 
Hardcover
  • Retail Price: $24.00
  • $16.56
    (Save 31%)

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock. Usually ships within 24 hours.

FREE Shipping for Club Members
Not a member? Join Today!
 
 
New & Used Marketplace 46 copies from $2.99
 
 
 

More About Deep Ancestry Inside the Genographic Project by Spencer Wells
 
 
 
Overview
Science tells us we're all related--one vast family sharing a common ancestor who lived in Africa 60,000 years ago. But countless questions remain about our great journey from the birthplace of "Homo sapiens" to the ends of the Earth. How did we end up where we are? When did we get there? Why do we display such a wide range of colors and features? The fossil record offers some answers, but exciting new genetic research reveals many more, since our DNA carries a complete chronicle of our species and its migrations.
"In Deep Ancestry, " scientist and explorer Spencer Wells shows how tiny genetic changes add up over time into a fascinating story. Using scores of real-life examples, helpful analogies, and detailed diagrams and illustrations, he translates complicated concepts into accessible language and explains exactly how each and every individual's DNA contributes another piece to the jigsaw puzzle of human history. The book takes readers inside the Genographic Project, the landmark study now assembling the world's largest collection of population genetic DNA samples and employing the latest in testing technology and computer analysis to examine hundreds of thousands of genetic profiles from all over the globe.
Traveling backward through time from today's scattered billions to the handful of early humans who are ancestors to us all, "Deep Ancestry" shows how universal our human heritage really is. It combines sophisticated science with our compelling interest in family history and ethnic identity--and transcends humankind's shallow distinctions and superficial differences to touch the depths of our common origins.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780792262152
  • ISBN-10: 0792262158
  • Publisher: National Geographic Society
  • Publish Date: November 2006
  • Page Count: 247


Related Categories

Books > Science > Life Sciences - Genetics & Genomics
Books > Social Science > Anthropology - Physical
Books > Science > Life Sciences - Evolution

 
BookPage Reviews

Scaling the human family tree

When Alex Haley published Roots in 1976, he spurred a nationwide craze in genealogy. People everywhere were poking around cemeteries, invading county courthouses and asking Great Aunt Millie if she still had the family Bible. With luck, a person might trace their lineage to the old country, eight or nine generations back. A lot has changed in 30 years. With the ability to map human DNA has come the capability to trace human ancestry and movements for the last 170,000 years.

In Deep Ancestry: Inside the Genographic Project, Spencer Wells, neatly summarizes the science of DNA sequencing and shows how the technology is used to determine population genetics—slight variations in DNA that define individual humans as members of specific genetic groups. These haplogroups, which are traceable either through female or male ancestors, reveal not whether a great-great-great uncle was a pirate, but whether a family's ancient ancestors migrated through Eastern Europe or Central Asia. By assembling databases of DNA from people across the globe, the Genographic Project—funded by the National Geographic Society, IBM and the Wait Society—is attempting to map the origins and migration pathways of our species.

Through individual examples, Wells, an Explorer-in-Residence at the National Geographic Society, tells what has already been discovered about our distant past. So far, the project has confirmed much of what archaeology and anthropology had already revealed: that humans arose in Africa and spread around the world, with local populations changing slightly in adaptation to their environment. The multidisciplinary confirmation of what was known is only the beginning. If the Genographic Project compiles a large enough database, many outstanding questions could be answered, such as: Did Europeans help colonize the Americas? Or, did early humans interbreed with Neanderthals?

Wells ends the book with an invitation to take part in the project by purchasing a participation kit and submitting a DNA sample for analysis and cataloguing, with results available confidentially through the Internet. This is a rare chance to not only learn about ourselves, but to contribute to a worldwide scientific experiment.

Chris Scott writes from Nashville, where he migrated from Michigan.

 
BAM Customer Reviews

DISCUSSION