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Divas, Dames & Daredevils : Lost Heroines of Golden Age Comics
by Mike Madrid and Ph.D. Maria Elena Buszek


Overview - ComicsAlliance and ComicsBlend Best Comic Book of the Year
BUST Magazine "Lit Pick" Recommendation
Certified Cool(TM) in PREVIEWS: The Comic Shop's Catalog

"Mike Madrid gives these forgotten superheroines their due.  Read more...


 
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More About Divas, Dames & Daredevils by Mike Madrid; Ph.D. Maria Elena Buszek
 
 
 
Overview
ComicsAlliance and ComicsBlend Best Comic Book of the Year
BUST Magazine "Lit Pick" Recommendation
Certified Cool(TM) in PREVIEWS: The Comic Shop's Catalog

"Mike Madrid gives these forgotten superheroines their due. These 'lost' heroines are now found--to the delight of comic book lovers everywhere." --STAN LEE

Wonder Woman, Mary Marvel, and Sheena, Queen of the Jungle ruled the pages of comic books in the 1940s, but many other heroines of the WWII era have been forgotten. Through twenty-eight full reproductions of vintage Golden Age comics, Divas, Dames & Daredevils reintroduces their ingenious abilities to mete out justice to Nazis, aliens, and evildoers of all kinds.

Each spine-tingling chapter opens with Mike Madrid's insightful commentary about heroines at the dawn of the comic book industry and reveals a universe populated by extraordinary women--superheroes, reporters, galactic warriors, daring detectives, and ace fighter pilots--who protected America and the world with wit and guile.

In these pages, fans will also meet heroines with striking similarities to more modern superheroes, including The Spider Queen, who deployed web shooters twenty years before Spider Man, and Marga the Panther Woman, whose feral instincts and sharp claws tore up the bad guys long before Wolverine. These women may have been overlooked in the annals of history, but their influence on popular culture, and the heroes we're passionate about today, is unmistakable.

Mike Madrid is the author of Divas, Dames & Daredevils: Lost Heroines of Golden Age Comics and The Supergirls: Fashion, Feminism, Fantasy, and the History of Comic Book Heroines, an NPR "Best Book To Share With Your Friends" and American Library Association Amelia Bloomer Project Notable Book. Madrid, a San Francisco native and lifelong fan of comic books and popular culture, also appears in the documentary Wonder Women The Untold Story of American Superheroines.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781935259237
  • ISBN-10: 1935259237
  • Publisher: Exterminating Angel Press
  • Publish Date: October 2013
  • Page Count: 236
  • Reading Level: Ages 12-UP
  • Dimensions: 9.07 x 7.08 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.97 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Literary Criticism > Comics & Graphic Novels
Books > Comics & Graphic Novels > Superheroes
Books > Social Science > Popular Culture - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2013-08-19
  • Reviewer: Staff

Madrid’s second book (following The Supergirls: Fashion, Feminism, Fantasy, and the History of Comic Book Heroines) is a comprehensively annotated collection of forgotten female comic book characters from the era of Golden Age comics. Each of the book’s four sections has an introduction, and a black-and-white comics story for each of the nearly 30 heroines featured. Covering everyone from Black Venus to Mysta of the Moon, the reprinted comics are sometimes magnificent and sometimes silly (and sometimes both), but they provide fantastic documentation of how many female characters were created during this era—some with surprisingly progressive personalities and stories to boot. The author’s passion for heroines and fascination with those who have been left behind are palpable. The volume touches briefly on how many women were creating these female-focused stories and whether that was an important factor in the progressive nature of the characters. Unfortunately, it’s an idea raised but not explored—while wholly enjoyable as an impressive, detailed collection shining a light on heroines long ago neglected, the volume is a bit lacking in analysis, which feels like a missed opportunity. (Oct.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews