Coupon
Draw What You See : The Life and Art of Benny Andrews
by Kathleen Benson and Benny Andrews


Overview - Benny Andrews loved to draw. He drew his nine brothers and sisters, and his parents. He drew the red earth of the fields where they all worked, the hot sun that beat down, and the rows and rows of crops. As Benny hauled buckets of water, he made pictures in his head.  Read more...

 
Hardcover
  • $17.99

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock

FREE Shipping for Club Members
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 24 copies from $2.99
 
 
 

More About Draw What You See by Kathleen Benson; Benny Andrews
 
 
 
Overview
Benny Andrews loved to draw. He drew his nine brothers and sisters, and his parents. He drew the red earth of the fields where they all worked, the hot sun that beat down, and the rows and rows of crops. As Benny hauled buckets of water, he made pictures in his head. And he dreamed of a better life--something beyond the segregation, the backbreaking labor, and the limited opportunities of his world. Benny's dreams took him far from the rural Georgia of his childhood. He became one of the most important African American painters of the twentieth century, and he opened doors for other artists of color. His story will inspire budding young artists to work hard and follow their dreams.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780544104877
  • ISBN-10: 0544104870
  • Publisher: Clarion Books
  • Publish Date: January 2015
  • Page Count: 32
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-7
  • Dimensions: 11 x 8.7 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.9 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Biography & Autobiography - Art
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > People & Places - United States - African-American
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Art - Painting

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-10-20
  • Reviewer: Staff

Artist Andrews’s own striking paintings illustrate the story of his life and work, eloquently told by Benson. With an often difficult childhood spent working in cotton fields, Andrews found inspiration for his childhood drawings from workers in the field, “church ladies’ hats and the preacher’s Bible stories,” comics, and movies. Andrews’s eventual departure from Georgia—first through the Air Force, then to art school in Chicago—led to a broadening of his subject matter and style. In New York City, his artwork increasingly reflected his social conscience: he painted Harlem residents, living at the advent of the civil rights movement. His images blend whimsical elements—tree leaves resemble globular mosaic glasswork in one scene—with stark depictions of struggle, emphasizing his efforts to find intersections between creativity and social justice. Ages 4–8. (Jan.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews