Coupon
The Drawing Lesson : A Graphic Novel That Teaches You How to Draw
by Mark Crilley


Overview - Read This Comic and Start Drawing Today Nominated for a 2017 Eisner Award

For the first time ever, drawing instructor and graphic novelist Mark Crilley brings his easy-to-follow artistic instruction to aspiring artists in the form of a comic book, providing you with a one-of-a-kind how-to experience.
  Read more...

 
Paperback
  • $18.99

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock

FREE Shipping for Club Members
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 30 copies from $9.45
 
 
 

More About The Drawing Lesson by Mark Crilley
 
 
 
Overview
Read This Comic and Start Drawing Today Nominated for a 2017 Eisner Award

For the first time ever, drawing instructor and graphic novelist Mark Crilley brings his easy-to-follow artistic instruction to aspiring artists in the form of a comic book, providing you with a one-of-a-kind how-to experience. In The Drawing Lesson, you'll meet David--a young boy who wants nothing more than to learn how to draw. Luckily for David, he's just met Becky--his helpful drawing mentor. Page by page, Becky teaches David (and you ) about the essential fundamentals that artists need in order to master drawing, all in a unique visual format. In panel after panel, Crilley provides lessons on shading, negative space, creating compositions, and more, with accompanying exercises that you can try for yourself. Are you ready to start your drawing lesson today?

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780385346337
  • ISBN-10: 0385346336
  • Publisher: Watson-Guptill
  • Publish Date: July 2016
  • Page Count: 144
  • Reading Level: Ages 10-13
  • Dimensions: 9.9 x 6.9 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Art > Techniques - Drawing
Books > Art > Study & Teaching
Books > Comics & Graphic Novels > General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2016-07-04
  • Reviewer: Staff

This instructional book offers thorough and practical lessons in drawing. The instruction is solid, covering proportion, shading, loose sketching, self-criticism, drawing shadows, and negative space. Each chapter features a drawing assignment. But the narrative framing the lessons is odd: David, a kid, approaches Becky, an artist, in a park and demands drawing lessons from her. Becky obliges, but David becomes insistent for more lessons and slowly infiltrates all aspects of her life to make these lessons happen. Becky protests and makes clear that David is crossing boundaries, but she eventually relents. This creates a sometimes antagonistic dynamic between the characters that seems at odds with what the book is trying to accomplish, not to mention the message of male privilege. The ending attempts to displace the gender concerns but feels creepy. Aside from how to draw, the ultimate lesson might be that kids shouldn’t chat up strangers in a park. (July)

 
BAM Customer Reviews