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Du Iz Tak?
by Carson Ellis


Overview - The creator of "Home "turns a droll eye to the natural world, with gorgeous art and a playful invented language.
"Du iz tak? "What is that? As a tiny shoot unfurls, two damselflies peer at it in wonder. When the plant grows taller and sprouts leaves, some young beetles arrive to gander, and soon with the help of a pill bug named Icky they wrangle a ladder and build a tree fort.
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More About Du Iz Tak? by Carson Ellis
 
 
 
Overview
The creator of "Home "turns a droll eye to the natural world, with gorgeous art and a playful invented language.
"Du iz tak? "What is that? As a tiny shoot unfurls, two damselflies peer at it in wonder. When the plant grows taller and sprouts leaves, some young beetles arrive to gander, and soon with the help of a pill bug named Icky they wrangle a ladder and build a tree fort. But this is the wild world, after all, and something horrible is waiting to swoop down "booby voobeck " only to be carried off in turn. "Su "With exquisitely detailed illustrations and tragicomic flair, Carson Ellis invites readers to imagine the dramatic possibilities to be found in even the humblest backyard. "Su ""

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780763665302
  • ISBN-10: 0763665304
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press (MA)
  • Publish Date: October 2016
  • Page Count: 48
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Nature & the Natural World - General
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Animals - Insects, Spiders, etc.

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2016-08-15
  • Reviewer: Staff

Ellis’s (Home) bewitching creation stars a lively company of insects who speak a language unrelated to English, and working out what they are saying is one of the story’s delights. In the first spread, two slender, elegantly winged creatures stand over a green shoot. “Du iz tak?” says the first, pointing. The other puts a hand to its mouth in puzzlement. “Ma nazoot,” it says. The insects marvel at the plant as it grows, build a fort in it (complete with pirate flag), exclaim as it produces a spectacular flower (“Unk scrivadelly gladdenboot!”), then disappear one by one, like actors exiting the stage. Observant readers will notice other changes over the course of the seasons: a fabulously hairy caterpillar spins a cocoon on a dead log, the log opens to reveal a cozy dwelling, and what looks like a twig atop the log is not a twig at all. Ellis renders the insects with exquisite, baroque precision, outfitting them with hats, eyeglasses, and tweed jackets; in a romantic interlude one serenades another with a violin. Generous expanses of cream-colored empty space emphasize the smallness and fragility of these living beings, who move busily along the forest floor at the bottom edge of the pages. Very gently, Ellis suggests that humans have no idea what wonders are unfolding at their feet—and that what takes place in the lives of insects is not so different from their own. Has there ever been anything quite like it? Ma nazoot. Ages 4–8. Agent: Steven Malk, Writers House. (Oct.)

 
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