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At Ellis Island : A History in Many Voices
by Louise Peacock and Walter Krudop


Overview - Ellis Island was the gateway to America and the promise of freedom for thousands. Its walls are rich with stories. Its walls are rich with stories. In this book we hear myriad of those voices. First we follow a young person today. Her great-great-grandmother entered America through Ellis Island.  Read more...

 
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More About At Ellis Island by Louise Peacock; Walter Krudop
 
 
 
Overview
Ellis Island was the gateway to America and the promise of freedom for thousands. Its walls are rich with stories. Its walls are rich with stories. In this book we hear myriad of those voices. First we follow a young person today. Her great-great-grandmother entered America through Ellis Island. As this young girl walks the halls of the famous site, she wonders about the past, the people, and their hopes, dreams and challenges.

Here, too, is the voice of Sera, an Armenian girl from the early 1900s. Fleeing the unthinkable in her home country, she longs to join her father in America. As Sera enters the halls of Ellis Island, she lives those same hopes, dreams, and challenges.

The voices of real immigrants -- their suffering in steerage, their first glimpse of the Statue of Liberty, and their journey through the Great Hall -- complete this touching look into an important part of America's history. A pivotal time and place is brought to life through a combination of many voices speaking in harmony.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780689830266
  • ISBN-10: 0689830262
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books
  • Publish Date: May 2007
  • Page Count: 44
  • Reading Level: Ages 7-10
  • Dimensions: 11.24 x 8.82 x 0.44 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.11 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Social Topics - Emigration & Immigration
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > History - United States/General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 60.
  • Review Date: 2007-06-25
  • Reviewer: Staff

In a tribute to the millions who came to America through Ellis Island, the pair behind Crossing the Delaware weaves together a historical tapestry of real-life anecdotes with the fictional, first-person accounts of two children’s visits—nearly 100 years apart—to the immigrant-processing station. The opening account (in blocky red typeface) features the thoughts of a contemporary young tourist recalling her great-great grandmother’s arrival to the island. This narrative presents much of the book’s factual content (“Children could not pass through alone. Sometimes they had to wait for days until an adult already in the country came to meet them”). In blue script, a parallel story is told through the letters of Sera, a 10-year-old Armenian immigrant, coming to America at the turn of the 20th century. She’s writing to her mother, and it’s only when Sera is almost sent back (her father is late coming to claim her) that readers realize her mother died in a massacre. “Back? Back to Armenia? But they will kill me! I will be dead like you, Mama. I scream, long and high, and turn to run.” Sera’s epistolary tale incorporates other actual events, including the sinking of the passenger ship, Mongolia. Krudop’s soft-edged, poignant gouache illustrations of Sera’s journey from ship’s rail to her father’s arms are juxtaposed with stark black-and-white archival images. Each spread’s busy layout includes photographs of and quotations from actual immigrants. Though it may require rereading several pages to follow the threads of the separate voices, the effort is worth it. Peacock has seamlessly stitched together fact and fiction and presented a composite picture of courage and hope. Ages 7-10. (June)

 
BookPage Reviews

The doorway for a century of immigrants

My eight-year-old twins and I pored over At Ellis Island: A History in Many Voices written by Louise Peacock and illustrated by Walter Lyon Krudop the night before we toured Ellis Island. It was the perfect introduction to one of the most fascinating spots in American history—and the place where my daughters' great-grandparents arrived from Ireland years ago.

This book packs plenty into its pages in a compelling way: historical photos, quotes from various immigrants and Ellis Island workers, illustrative paintings and the fictional diary of Sera, a 10-year-old girl whose mother has died, on a ship from Armenia. These different facets work well together to create an incredibly vivid, informative look at the difficulties of traveling to a strange land and experiencing the joy, confusion and fears of the Ellis Island bureaucracy.

 
BAM Customer Reviews