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Farmer George Plants a Nation
by Peggy Thomas and Layne Johnson


Overview - George Washington as he's rarely seen. Besides being a general and the first president of the United States, George Washington was also a farmer. His efforts to create a self-sufficient farm at Mount Vernon, Virginia, mirrored his struggle to form a new nation.  Read more...

 
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More About Farmer George Plants a Nation by Peggy Thomas; Layne Johnson
 
 
 
Overview
George Washington as he's rarely seen. Besides being a general and the first president of the United States, George Washington was also a farmer. His efforts to create a self-sufficient farm at Mount Vernon, Virginia, mirrored his struggle to form a new nation. Excerpts from Washington's writings are featured throughout this NSTA/CBC Outstanding Science Trade Book, which also includes a timeline, resource section, as well as essays on Washington at Mount Vernon and his thoughts on slavery. Both illustrator and author worked closely with the staff of Mount Vernon Estate & Gardens to render an accurate portrait of Farmer George at work.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781590784600
  • ISBN-10: 159078460X
  • Publisher: Calkins Creek Books
  • Publish Date: February 2008
  • Page Count: 40
  • Reading Level: Ages 8-11


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Biography & Autobiography - Historical
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Biography & Autobiography - Presidents & First Families (U.S
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > History - United States/Colonial & Revolutionary

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 56.
  • Review Date: 2008-02-04
  • Reviewer: Staff

Thomas (Joshua the Giant Frog) and Johnson (Remembering Grandpa) depict George Washington as a forward-thinking farmer dedicated to making Mount Vernon a self-sufficient, profitable plantation. Emphasizing Washington's innovative thinking and experimentation, the narrative explains how he invented a plow to streamline the planting of crops, rotated his crops and tested different fertilizers, bred donkeys and horses to create strong mules and designed a treading barn with 16 sides. Quotes from Washington's diaries and letters, presented in script outside the main text, demonstrate his devotion to improving his farm and lend credence to the author's assertion that “George's thoughts were never far from home,” even during the Revolution and his presidency. Thomas's history is extremely detailed, full of facts that bring the 18th-century farm to life. She also addresses the obvious paradox: she concludes her work by praising Washington for “plant[ing] the seed of freedom on the battlefield,” then explores his role as the owner of slaves in an endnote. Johnson's representational paintings, all of them flattering, incorporate symbols like bald eagles but also illuminate the workings of the plantation; a cutaway view of the 16-sided barn is especially helpful. A useful look at a lesser-known aspect of Washington's achievements. Ages 8-up. (Feb.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews