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Fever Dream
by Samanta Schweblin and Megan Mcdowell


Overview - "Genius." --Jia Tolentino, The New Yorker
"Samanta Schweblin's electric story reads like a Fever Dream ." --Vanity Fair
Shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize

Experience the blazing, surreal sensation of a fever dream...  Read more...


 
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More About Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin; Megan Mcdowell
 
 
 
Overview
"Genius." --Jia Tolentino, The New Yorker
"Samanta Schweblin's electric story reads like a Fever Dream." --Vanity Fair
Shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize

Experience the blazing, surreal sensation of a fever dream...

A young woman named Amanda lies dying in a rural hospital clinic. A boy named David sits beside her. She's not his mother. He's not her child. Together, they tell a haunting story of broken souls, toxins, and the power and desperation of family.

Fever Dream is a nightmare come to life, a ghost story for the real world, a love story and a cautionary tale. One of the freshest new voices to come out of the Spanish language and translated into English for the first time, Samanta Schweblin creates an aura of strange psychological menace and otherworldly reality in this absorbing, unsettling, taut novel.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780399184598
  • ISBN-10: 0399184597
  • Publisher: Riverhead Books
  • Publish Date: January 2017
  • Page Count: 192
  • Dimensions: 7.1 x 4.9 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.55 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Literary
Books > Fiction > Psychological
Books > Fiction > Horror - General

 
BookPage Reviews

A mind-bending Argentinian suspense novel

Argentinian author Samanta Schweblin’s English-language debut, Fever Dream, snares readers. It’s a page-turner of mounting dread, unfolding entirely through a conversation between a bedridden young woman and the boy who whispers in her ear.

Amanda lies dying in a hospital clinic in rural Argentina. Sitting next to her is David, a boy who asks her—urges her—to remember the events of whatever trauma rendered her terminally ill. At his behest, Amanda recalls meeting David’s mother, a nervous and elegant woman named Carla. Carla tells Amanda a strange story about a very young David, who drinks the same toxic water that kills Carla’s husband’s prized stallion. To spare her son’s life, Carla calls upon a local woman with medicinal and magical abilities. By splitting David’s soul with another child’s, she saves the boy.

But this is only the beginning. Why is Amanda in the hospital? And what has happened to Amanda’s own daughter, Nina? Time and again, Amanda references the “rescue distance,” the variable space between her and Nina, the distance between a mother and any worst-case scenario that may imperil her child. “I spend half the day calculating it,” Amanda says. As she recalls more and more details, Amanda begins to tell the story her own way, trying to make sense of what matters in these events and what does not—and decide which threats are inevitable or imagined.

With the urgency, attention to detail and threat of an abrupt ending that define short stories, the novel builds unease seamlessly through exceptionally well-paced dialogue. The sparseness of Schweblin’s prose, translated by Megan McDowell, anchors this strange conversation and keeps it from becoming disorienting. 

Minimalist yet complex, monochromatic yet textured, Fever Dream is a delicate and marvelously constructed tale, like a bundle of our darkest worries artfully arranged into our own likeness.

 

This article was originally published in the January 2017 issue of BookPage. Download the entire issue for the Kindle or Nook

 
BAM Customer Reviews