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Fist Stick Knife Gun : A Personal History of Violence
by Geoffrey Canada and Jamar Nicholas


Overview -

Long before President Barack Obama praised his work as "an all-encompassing, all-hands-on-deck anti-poverty effort that is literally saving a generation of children," and First Lady Michelle Obama called him "one of my heroes," Geoffrey Canada was a small and scared boy growing up in the South Bronx.  Read more...


 
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More About Fist Stick Knife Gun by Geoffrey Canada; Jamar Nicholas
 
 
 
Overview

Long before President Barack Obama praised his work as "an all-encompassing, all-hands-on-deck anti-poverty effort that is literally saving a generation of children," and First Lady Michelle Obama called him "one of my heroes," Geoffrey Canada was a small and scared boy growing up in the South Bronx. His childhood world was one where "sidewalk boys" learned the codes of the block and were ranked through the rituals of fist, stick, knife, and, finally, gun. In a stunning pairing, acclaimed comics creator Jamar Nicholas presents Canada's raw and riveting account, one of the most authentic and important true stories of urban violence ever told.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780807044490
  • ISBN-10: 0807044490
  • Publisher: Beacon Press (MA)
  • Publish Date: September 2010
  • Page Count: 124
  • Reading Level: Ages 12-17
  • Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.48 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Comics & Graphic Novels > General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2010-10-04
  • Reviewer: Staff

Canada, a legendary educator and crusader for inner-city-youth, first published in 1995 his revelatory account of the daunting push toward violent behavior that was a part of his Bronx childhood. This graphic adaptation by Nicholas works as a kind of youth-friendly summary of that book's conclusions. Canada's thoughtful, no-nonsense narrative begins in the Bronx in the late 1950s, after his father left him, his mother, and two brothers to fend for themselves. The spine of the story is not so much the broad array of violence on display in a neighborhood suffering from postwar white flight and increases in crime, but Canada's surgical analysis of the stages of violence and the strictly codified strata that reigned on his street and in his school. Helped by Nicholas's dramatic but low-key illustrations, Canada describes how he graduated from one level of violence to the next in a sort of ladder of self-protection. This inexorable evolution is dismaying enough before Canada moves ahead to show how those codes of violence eventually collapsed under an influx of guns. This is exactly the sort of broadly appealing and gripping nonfiction graphic novel that librarians need to be adding to their shelves. (Oct.)

 
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