Coupon
Flunking Sainthood : A Year of Breaking the Sabbath, Forgetting to Pray, and Still Loving My Neighbor
by Jana Riess


Overview - Can an ordinary 21st-century American become a saint? No, apparently not. But you can have a lot of fun trying. 192 pp.   Read more...

 
Paperback
  • $16.99
  • 20% off for Members: Get the Club Price
    $ 13.59

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock Online.

FREE Shipping for Club Members
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 39 copies from $2.99
 
 
 

More About Flunking Sainthood by Jana Riess
 
 
 
Overview
Can an ordinary 21st-century American become a saint? No, apparently not. But you can have a lot of fun trying. 192 pp.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781557256607
  • ISBN-10: 1557256608
  • Publisher: Paraclete Press (MA)
  • Publish Date: November 2011
  • Page Count: 179
  • Reading Level: Ages 18-UP


Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Religious
Books > Religion > Christian Life - Inspirational
Books > Biography & Autobiography > Personal Memoirs

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-09-12
  • Reviewer: Staff

Punchy humor and unpretentious inquisitiveness combine in this absorbing memoir in which former PW editor Riess (What Would Buffy Do?) commits to both adopting and studying a new religious practice each month for a year, while simultaneously reflecting on her spiritual progress. Choosing such diverse disciplines as fasting “like a Muslim during Ramadan,” exploring lectio divina, observing an Orthodox Jewish Sabbath, practicing Benedictine hospitality, and engaging in the Liturgy of the Hours, the author shares frustrations and insights in a manner likely to amuse and comfort readers, especially those who have attempted such exercises and also found them challenging. For example, Riess’s description of her internal dialogue during Centering Prayer, concludes, “ ‘Shut the hell up!’ yells Spiritual Mind,” while her experience of practicing mindfulness, with annoying help from the never sainted Brother Lawrence, leads to a sympathetic observation that he’s “an underappreciated housewife.” Supporting quotes from saints and writers (St. John Chrysostom, Dorothy Day, Thornton Wilder) pepper the text. The author’s declared “failures” make her a sympathetic witness, while such “successes” as her description of how “ratitude practically tackles me,” prove genuinely moving. A witty, inspiring read. (Nov.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews