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Fragments of Horror
by Junji Ito


Overview - A new collection of delightfully macabre tales from a master of horror manga. An old wooden mansion that turns on its inhabitants. A dissection class with a most unusual subject. A funeral where the dead are definitely not laid to rest. Ranging from the terrifying to the comedic, from the erotic to the loathsome, these stories showcase Junji Ito's long-awaited return to the world of horror.  Read more...

 
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More About Fragments of Horror by Junji Ito
 
 
 
Overview
A new collection of delightfully macabre tales from a master of horror manga. An old wooden mansion that turns on its inhabitants. A dissection class with a most unusual subject. A funeral where the dead are definitely not laid to rest. Ranging from the terrifying to the comedic, from the erotic to the loathsome, these stories showcase Junji Ito's long-awaited return to the world of horror.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781421580791
  • ISBN-10: 1421580799
  • Publisher: Viz Media
  • Publish Date: June 2015
  • Page Count: 224
  • Dimensions: 8.5 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.9 pounds

Series: Fragments of Horror #1

Related Categories

Books > Comics & Graphic Novels > Manga - Horror

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-05-18
  • Reviewer: Staff

Visceral horror dominates this mature-audiences short story collection that makes up for what it lacks in variety and quality of storytelling with creepy visuals. Though Ito (Uzumaki) is best known for his inhuman creatures, “Gentle Goodbye,” about a family who wills their loved ones into a shadow life after death, shows that he can be just as effective when restrained—focusing on facial emotions, for instance. Like all good horror, the realistic depictions becomes nightmarish (there are no visual exaggerations common to manga); Ito can create images that might make the most unflappable reader flinch. But the heavy use of the “evil woman” trope is a major problem, and more than a bit sexist. Seeing the powerful images only Ito can draw—a lifeless face surrounded by eyes all over the page, a possessed girl dripping blood—should trump the outdated plot devices for forgiving readers. (June)

 
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