Coupon
Further Joy
by John Brandon


Overview - In eleven expertly crafted stories, John Brandon gives us a stunning assortment of men and women at the edge of possibility--gamblers and psychics, wanderers and priests, all of them on the verge of finding out what they can get away with, and what they can't.  Read more...

 
Hardcover
  • $24.00

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock Online.

FREE Shipping for Club Members
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 26 copies from $2.99
 
eBook
Retail Price: $23.99
$16.94

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

Download

This item is available only to U.S. and Canada billing addresses.
 
 
 

More About Further Joy by John Brandon
 
 
 
Overview
In eleven expertly crafted stories, John Brandon gives us a stunning assortment of men and women at the edge of possibility--gamblers and psychics, wanderers and priests, all of them on the verge of finding out what they can get away with, and what they can't. Ranging from haunted deserts to alligator-filled swamps, these are stories of foul luck and strange visitations, delivered with deadpan humor by an unforgettable voice.
"The New York Times" praised Brandon's last novel for a style that combined Elmore Leonard and Charles Portis, and now Brandon brings that same darkly American artistry to his very first story collection, demonstrating once again that he belongs in the top ranks of contemporary writers.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781938073946
  • ISBN-10: 1938073940
  • Publisher: McSweeney's
  • Publish Date: June 2014
  • Page Count: 221
  • Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Short Stories (single author)

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-04-21
  • Reviewer: Staff

In his first collection of short stories, Brandon (A Million Heavens) puts forth 11 satisfying portraits of small-town American life and the complex lives of the people who inhabit those communities. With sprightly precision, he chronicles familiar scenes: a couple sitting on the front porch, strangers conversing at bar, neighbors chatting over the balcony. Yet behind these quaint images of quotidian life exists a common human desire for excitement, purpose, and passion. In many of the stories, characters go to extreme ends to maintain their images, create new ones, or realize their imagined lives. Some indulge in illegal schemes to regain lost wealth ("The Favorite"); others simply reflect upon the lives they've made for themselves ("The Picnickers"). While Brandon's language is accessible and humorous, at times it cannot relieve the drabness of the circumstances he's portraying. The collection does have stories that contain mysterious happenings—strange objects appear out of nowhere in one character's home in "The Differing Views," friends go missing in "Palatka," and in "The Inland News" past murder cases resurface—but these stories are less successful. Brandon is at his best when transforming the unremarkable into something worth giving a second glance. (June)

 
BAM Customer Reviews