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The Future of Management
by Gary Hamel and Bill Breen

Overview - Hamel argues that management innovation fuels long-term business success. He contends that the management paradigm of the last century--centered on control and efficiency--no longer suffices in a world where adaptability and creativity drive business success.  Read more...

 
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More About The Future of Management by Gary Hamel; Bill Breen
 
 
 
Overview
Hamel argues that management innovation fuels long-term business success. He contends that the management paradigm of the last century--centered on control and efficiency--no longer suffices in a world where adaptability and creativity drive business success.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781422102503
  • ISBN-10: 1422102505
  • Publisher: Harvard Business School Press
  • Publish Date: October 2007
  • Page Count: 272


Related Categories

Books > Business & Economics > Management - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 60.
  • Review Date: 2007-08-20
  • Reviewer: Staff

Though this authoritative examination of today's static corporate management systems reads like a business school treatise, it isn't the same-old thing. Hamel, a well-known business thinker and author (Leading the Revolution), advocates that dogma be rooted out and a new future be imagined and invented. To aid managers and leaders on this mission, Hamel offers case studies and measured analysis of “management innovators” like Google and W.L. Gore (makers of Gore-Tex), then lists lessons that can be drawn from them. He doesn't gloss over how difficult it will be to reinvent management, comparing the new and needed shift in thinking to Darwin's “abandoning creationist traditions” and physicists who had to “look beyond Newton's clockwork laws” to discover quantum mechanics. But the steps needed to make such a profound shift aren't clearly outlined here either. The book serves primarily as an invitation to shed age-old systems and processes and think differently. There's little humor and few punchy catchphrases—the book has less sparkle than Jeffrey Pfeffer's What Were They Thinking?—but its content will likely appeal to managers accustomed to b-school textbooks and tired of gimmicky business evangelism. (Oct.)

 
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