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The Gate Thief
by Orson Scott Card


Overview - In this sequel to "The Lost Gate," bestselling author Card continues his fantastic tale of the Mages of Westil who live in exile on Earth. Danny North is in school, yet he holds all the stolen outselves of 13 centuries of gatemages. The Families still want to kill him, but they can't control him.  Read more...

 
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More About The Gate Thief by Orson Scott Card
 
 
 
Overview

In this sequel to "The Lost Gate," bestselling author Card continues his fantastic tale of the Mages of Westil who live in exile on Earth. Danny North is in school, yet he holds all the stolen outselves of 13 centuries of gatemages. The Families still want to kill him, but they can't control him. He is far too powerful.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780765326584
  • ISBN-10: 0765326582
  • Publisher: Tor Books
  • Publish Date: March 2013
  • Page Count: 384

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Series: Mither Mages
 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2013-01-14
  • Reviewer: Staff

In this middling sequel to The Lost Gate, Card connects Egyptian myth with his “literalizing of Indo-European gods” to create Danny North, the 16-year-old incarnation of the messenger/trickster god Thoth-Mercury-Hermes-Loki. Danny masquerades as an ordinary teen but is the son of the Norse gods Odin and Gerd. He’s just coming into his full powers as a gate mage when some of the old gods set out to kill him. He’s also so filled with “innate goodness” that he can fend off all the hot girls who want him and subdue his own adolescent hormones. Naturally, he takes on the task of saving Earth and defeating the forces of evil through a heroic act that’s devoid of real consequences. Card’s afterword reveals his struggles with clarifying his unusual and highly complicated world-building, but only the most devoted readers will have sympathy for these creative problems. (Mar.)

 
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