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Ghost in the Wires : My Adventures As the World's Most Wanted Hacker
by Kevin Mitnick and William L. Simon and Steve Wozniak

Overview - Mitnick, the world's most wanted computer hacker, managed to hack into some of the country's most powerful--and seemingly impenetrable--agencies and companies. The suspenseful heart of the book unfolds as Mitnick disappears on a three-year run from the FBI.  Read more...

 
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More About Ghost in the Wires by Kevin Mitnick; William L. Simon; Steve Wozniak
 
 
 
Overview
Mitnick, the world's most wanted computer hacker, managed to hack into some of the country's most powerful--and seemingly impenetrable--agencies and companies. The suspenseful heart of the book unfolds as Mitnick disappears on a three-year run from the FBI.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780316037709
  • ISBN-10: 0316037702
  • Publisher: Little Brown & Co
  • Publish Date: August 2011
  • Page Count: 413


Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Criminals & Outlaws
Books > Computers & Internet > Security - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-04-18
  • Reviewer: Staff

It's the piquant human element that really animates this rollicking memoir of high-tech skullduggery. Mitnick (The Art of Deception) recounts his epic illegal computer hacks of Sun Microsystems, Digital Equipment Corporation, and any number of cellphone makers; his exploits triggered a manhunt that made headlines. He insists he did it not for money but for the transgressive thrill of looking at big, secret computer programs—otherwise he apparently lived a threadbare existence on the lam—and the claim rings true; there's something obsessive and pure about his need to hack and brag about it to others, habits which eventually brought about his downfall. Mitnick's hacking narratives are lucid to neophytes and catnip to people who love code, but the book's heart is his "social engineering"—his preternatural ability to schmooze and manipulate. By learning their procedures and mimicking their lingo, he gets cops, technicians, DMV functionaries, and other mandarins—his control over telephone companies is almost godlike—to divulge their secrets and do his bidding. The considerable charm of this nonstop caper saga lies in seeing the giant, faceless bureaucracies that rule and regulate us unmasked as assemblages of hapless people dancing to a plucky con man's tune. Photos. (Aug. 15)

 
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