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Girl, Stolen
by April Henry

Overview -

Sixteen year-old Cheyenne Wilder is sleeping in the back of a car while her mom fills her prescription at the pharmacy. Before Cheyenne realizes what's happening, their car is being stolen--with her inside Griffin hadn't meant to kidnap Cheyenne, all he needed to do was steal a car for the others.  Read more...


 
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More About Girl, Stolen by April Henry
 
 
 
Overview

Sixteen year-old Cheyenne Wilder is sleeping in the back of a car while her mom fills her prescription at the pharmacy. Before Cheyenne realizes what's happening, their car is being stolen--with her inside Griffin hadn't meant to kidnap Cheyenne, all he needed to do was steal a car for the others. But once Griffin's dad finds out that Cheyenne's father is the president of a powerful corporation, everything changes--now there's a reason to keep her. What Griffin doesn't know is that Cheyenne is not only sick with pneumonia, she is blind. How will Cheyenne survive this nightmare, and if she does, at what price?

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780805090055
  • ISBN-10: 0805090053
  • Publisher: Henry Holt & Company
  • Publish Date: September 2010
  • Page Count: 213
  • Reading Level: Ages 12-18

Series: Christy Ottaviano Books

Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Social Issues - Special Needs
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Social Issues - Adolescence
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Social Issues - Death & Dying

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2010-09-20
  • Reviewer: Staff

While waiting in the car for her stepmother, 16-year-old Cheyenne is accidentally kidnapped by Griffin, a hard-edged teenager who steals the family's Escalade. She is blind, and while this makes her less of a concern for Griffin, his father, and their crew of thugs (who steal cars, replace the VIN numbers, and resell them), an escape is all but impossible ("She no longer knew anything about the world. All she knew about was herself. Her world had shrunk to the edges of her skin"). Cheyenne's disability grants her unexpected strengths; she learns to use her blindness and a case of pneumonia to her advantage, manipulating Griffin into sympathizing with her. When the men discover that Cheyenne's father is the president of Nike, they begin negotiating a ransom, but the question remains: can she trust Griffin to let her go? Henry (Torched) spins a captivating tale that shifts between Cheyenne's and Griffin's thoughts. Both are well-built, complex characters, trapped in their own ways by life's circumstances, which--paired with a relentlessly fast pace--ensures a tense read. Ages 12–up. (Oct.)

 
BookPage Reviews

Cheyenne and Griffin, victims or victors?

When Griffin slips into the Cadillac Escalade, its keys left in the ignition at the mall parking lot, he only means to steal it as a gift for his father. Within seconds he realizes that he’s stolen a girl too. In April Henry’s suspenseful and well-researched Girl, Stolen, 16-year-old Cheyenne Wilder, resting in the backseat while her stepmother runs into the pharmacy to pick up her prescription, is not only suffering from pneumonia, but has been blind for the last three years. Is escape even possible for her?

The spine-tingling chapters alternate between the teens’ perspectives as Griffin delivers both the vehicle and the girl to his cruel father, Roy. While Cheyenne plots to outwit her captors, flee Roy’s home in a remote wooded area and gather as much information as possible to turn over to police when (or if) she’s rescued, readers learn more about the accident that took Cheyenne’s mother and sight. And as Griffin, a high-school dropout with a troubled background and grief of his own, begins to see his surroundings in a whole new light, he wonders if he’s as much a bad guy as Roy and his accomplices, who are busy plotting how to use and dispose of Cheyenne. Perhaps Cheyenne is not the only victim in this escalating dilemma.

Reminiscent of Gail Giles’ thrillers and tension-filled to the last sentence, Girl, Stolen will resonate with readers long after the cover is closed. With a thoughtful and eye-opening look at disabilities, it highlights Cheyenne and Griffin’s resourcefulness and resiliency as they save themselves—and possibly each other.

 

 
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