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The Girl Who Fell to Earth
by Sophia Al-maria


Overview -

Award-winning filmmaker and writer Sophia Al-Maria's The Girl Who Fell to Earth is a funny and wry coming-of-age memoir about growing up in between American and Gulf Arab cultures. With poignancy and humor, Al-Maria shares the struggles of being raised by an American mother and Bedouin father while shuttling between homes in the Pacific Northwest and the Middle East.  Read more...


 
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More About The Girl Who Fell to Earth by Sophia Al-maria
 
 
 
Overview

Award-winning filmmaker and writer Sophia Al-Maria's The Girl Who Fell to Earth is a funny and wry coming-of-age memoir about growing up in between American and Gulf Arab cultures. With poignancy and humor, Al-Maria shares the struggles of being raised by an American mother and Bedouin father while shuttling between homes in the Pacific Northwest and the Middle East. Part family saga and part personal quest, The Girl Who Fell to Earth traces Al-Maria's journey to make a place for herself in two different worlds.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780061999758
  • ISBN-10: 006199975X
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial
  • Publish Date: November 2012
  • Page Count: 271
  • Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.24 x 0.64 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.49 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Personal Memoirs
Books > Travel > Middle East - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-10-08
  • Reviewer: Staff

In this funny, insightful memoir, artist, filmmaker, and writer Al-Maria chronicles being raised by an American mother from rural Washington State and a Bedouin father from Qatar. After immigrating to America, marrying the author’s mother and building a life, Al-Maria’s father returns to Doha. Soon Al-Maria and her mother follow. Both have trouble settling into their new way of life. “Now that I knew there were two authorities in my life, Ma’s rules and the tribe’s rules, assimilation equaled rebellion.” When Al-Maria’s father takes a second wife, Al-Maria and her mother return to America. But tensions mount when the author enters fifth grade and becomes quite curious about sex, culminating with Al-Maria being sent back to her father in the Arabian Gulf. During high school her confusion mounts, causing what Al-Maria calls “cultural whiplash: “My situation had been thrown glaringly into focus by the proximity of my American and Arab worlds, which existed within a few roundabouts of each other.” Al-Maria’s narrative is laced with keen observations on Bedouin culture, class distinctions, sexual rules, and everyday life in the Middle East and America. Her story is a satisfying trek through a complex cross-cultural landscape toward a creative and satisfying life. (Dec.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews