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Glass House : The 1% Economy and the Shattering of the All-American Town
by Brian Alexander


Overview -

In 1947, Forbes magazine declared Lancaster, Ohio the epitome of the all-American town. Today it is damaged, discouraged, and fighting for its future. In Glass House , journalist Brian Alexander uses the story of one town to show how seeds sown 35 years ago have sprouted to give us Trumpism, inequality, and an eroding national cohesion.  Read more...


 
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More About Glass House by Brian Alexander
 
 
 
Overview

In 1947, Forbes magazine declared Lancaster, Ohio the epitome of the all-American town. Today it is damaged, discouraged, and fighting for its future. In Glass House, journalist Brian Alexander uses the story of one town to show how seeds sown 35 years ago have sprouted to give us Trumpism, inequality, and an eroding national cohesion.

The Anchor Hocking Glass Company, once the world s largest maker of glass tableware, was the base on which Lancaster s society was built. As Glass House unfolds, bankruptcy looms. With access to the company and its leaders, and Lancaster s citizens, Alexander shows how financial engineering took hold in the 1980s, accelerated in the 21st Century, and wrecked the company. We follow CEO Sam Solomon, an African-American leading the nearly all-white town s biggest private employer, as he tries to rescue the company from the New York private equity firm that hired him. Meanwhile, Alexander goes behind the scenes, entwined with the lives of residents as they wrestle with heroin, politics, high-interest lenders, low wage jobs, technology, and the new demands of American life: people like Brian Gossett, the fourth generation to work at Anchor Hocking; Joe Piccolo, first-time director of the annual music festival who discovers the town relies on him, and it, for salvation; Jason Roach, who police believed may have been Lancaster s biggest drug dealer; and Eric Brown, a local football hero-turned-cop who comes to realize that he can never arrest Lancaster s real problems.

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Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781250085801
  • ISBN-10: 1250085802
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publish Date: February 2017
  • Page Count: 336
  • Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.15 pounds


Related Categories

Books > History > United States - State & Local - Midwest
Books > Business & Economics > Corporate & Business History - General
Books > Business & Economics > Industries - Manufacturing

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2016-11-28
  • Reviewer: Staff

Journalist Alexander (America Unzipped) tells the story of how her hometown of Lancaster, Ohioabout which a 1947 Forbes cover story pronounced this is Americahas been devastated by a barrage of economic forces. It was built on industry (initially shoe manufacturing, and then glassmaking), and factories employed much of Lancasters population for decades. Eventually one glass company, Anchor Hocking, emerged as the focal point, providing steady income and uniting the community. As noted by Alexander, Residents believed their town was the way America was supposed to be. But by the 1980s, business and financial changes hit both America and Anchor Hocking, including increased competition and corporate raiders. This forced the company and Lancaster residents into a downward spiral of low wages, fewer job opportunities, heroin abuse, and a general feeling of hopelessness. Through research and interviews with dozens of Lancaster residents, Alexander paints a picture of a town thats typical of many formerly thriving communities across America. Change is tough, especially with todays societal disconnection and the financialization and digitalization of American life. This is a particularly timely read for our tumultuous and divisive era. Agent: Michelle Tessler, Tessler Literary Agency. (Feb.)

 
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