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Good Dog. Stay.
by Anna Quindlen

Overview - Pulitzer Prize-winning author Quindlen honors the life of her her beloved black Labrador retriever, Beau, in this heartening and bittersweet work. With her trademark wisdom and humor, Quindlen reflects on how her life has unfolded in tandem with Beaus, and on the lessons shes learned by watching him.  Read more...

 
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More About Good Dog. Stay. by Anna Quindlen
 
 
 
Overview
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Quindlen honors the life of her her beloved black Labrador retriever, Beau, in this heartening and bittersweet work. With her trademark wisdom and humor, Quindlen reflects on how her life has unfolded in tandem with Beaus, and on the lessons shes learned by watching him.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781400067138
  • ISBN-10: 1400067138
  • Publisher: Random House (NY)
  • Publish Date: November 2007
  • Page Count: 82


Related Categories

Books > Pets > Essays & Narratives
Books > Pets > Dogs - General

 
BookPage Reviews

Bidding farewell

Who else but Anna Quindlen could make the short life of an ordinary Labrador retriever so profound? Good Dog. Stay. is a short, elegiac book of black-and-white photographs sprinkled with text, based on a popular Newsweek column by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author (A Short Guide to a Happy Life, Object Lessons). Barely touching upon the predictable shoe-chewing antics of Lab puppy Beau, a 40th birthday present, she dwells most movingly on the more difficult aspects of aging alongside her dog, noting creaky legs, clouding eyes and the fleeting bittersweet arc of a life that follows children growing up and leaving home. When it comes time to say goodbye, Quindlen lays Beau on their patterned carpet—favored as it hides the dirt that a sick, old dog creates—surrounded by her now grown children and watches as the dog is put down while her husband's tears fall like raindrops on her head. "Occasionally someone will tell me that they won't have pets because they're messy, and I suppose there's some truth to that," Quindlen writes. "I have to choke down the temptation to respond that life is messy, and that its vagaries go down hardest with those who fool themselves into thinking that they can keep it neat."

 
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